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Types of Lights and Light Structures, Continued - 14220_116
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Sector Lights - 14220_118
Factors Associated with Navigational Lights Light  Colors There  are  only  three  light  colors  in  common  use  on  fixed  lighted navigation  aids--white,  green,  and  red.  All  lighted  navigation  aids, regardless  of  the  color  of  their  light,  are  symbolized  on  a  chart  either  by a  magenta  colored  ray  in  the  form  of  an  exclamation  point  or  by  a  one- eighth-inch  magenta  circle,  superimposed  over  a  black  dot  indicating  the location  of  the  light. On  charts,  the  color  of  the  light,  if  other  than  white,  is  indicated  by  the abbreviations  R  for  red  and  G  for  green,  written  near  the  light  symbol. A  white  light  has  no  abbreviation  on  a  chart.  Thus,  if  a  magenta  light symbol  appears  on  a  chart  with  no  color  abbreviation  nearby,  the navigator  should  assume  its  color  to  be  white. In  the  Light  List  and  List  of  Lights,  however,  the  color  of  a  white  light  is indicated  by  the  abbreviation  W. Alternating Lights If  a  light  is  made  to  change  color  in  a  regular  pattern,  either  by alternately  energizing  different  color  lights  or  by  passing  colored  lenses around  the  same  light,  the  light  is  an  alternating  light,  abbreviated  Al. Alternating  lights  used  in  conjunction  with  different  phase  characteristics show  a  very  distinctive  appearance  that  cannot  be  easily  mistaken.  Their use  is  generally  reserved  for  special  applications  requiring  the  exercise of  great  caution,  such  as  airport  beacons,  harbor  entrance  lights,  and lighthouses. 4-19

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