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Planning and Constructing Restricted Water Tracks, continued - 14220_383
Planning and Constructing Restricted Water Tracks, Continued Red and Yellow Red  soundings  are  defined  as  the  minimum  depth  beneath  the  keel  that Soundings the  CO  deems  acceptable.  For  example,  the  CO  may  desire  that  the ship’s  draft  +  3  feet  equal  the  value  for  red  soundings.  For  a  ship  with a  draft  of  30',  the  red  sounding  would  equal  33'.  This  means  that  at  no time  may  the  ship  enter  water  with  a  depth  of  less  than  33' Yellow  soundings  are  defined  as  the  depth  beneath  the  keel  that indicates  potential  danger.  This  depth  is  also  determined  by  the  CO.  It may  be  the  ship’s  draft  +  6  feet. Red  and  yellow  soundings  are  marked  on  the  chart  using  a  fine  felt  tip marker  of  the  correct  color  (red  or  yellow).  After  studying  the  charted depths,  freehand  draw  the  red  and  yellow  soundings  limits.  The  result will  yield  a  red  or  yellow  line  similar  to  a  fathom  curve. Highlighting NAVAIDS Turn Bearings and  Ranges All  prominent  NAVAIDS  must  be  highlighted  in  yellow.  This  includes any  radar  navigation  points  that  are  selected  for  use.  Radar  points should  be  labeled  beginning  with  the  letter  A  in  the  direction  of  travel. Turn  bearings  and  ranges  indicate  the  instant  at  which  the  rudder  is  put over  to  execute  a  left  or  right  turn.  Turn  bearings  and  ranges  are  created by  using  the  advance  and  transfer  quantities  (see  fig.  12-4)  of  your ship’s  handling  characteristics  to  plot  a  point  on  your  track  to  which  a bearing  line  or  range  arc  is  laid  to  a  prominent  NAVAID.  A  lighted NAVAID  is  best  for  day  and  night  versatility  for  bearing  lines  only. The  NAVAID  should  be  as  nearly  perpendicular  to  the  ship’s  track  as possible.  In  narrow  channels  or  tight  turns  the  ship’s  transfer  quantity must  be  closely  considered  when  laying  the  turn  bearing  or  range  arc. See  figure  12-5. Turn  ranges  present  a  few  differences  from  turn  bearings.  The  turn range  is  an  arc  segment  and  should  be  identified’  on  the  primary  chart  by a  unique  color  or  plotted  only  on  the  CIC  secondary  plot  chart.  If  the use  of  turn  ranges  is  necessary,  for  example,  fog  restricted  visibility,  the navigator  will  normally  shift  his  or  her  station  to  the  CIC  secondary plot. The  slide  bar  technique  is  accomplished  by  paralleling  the  next  intended course  to  the  ship’s  actual  course.  By  doing  this,  the  turn  bearing  can be  easily  revised  as  shown  in  figure  12-5. 12-8

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