Quantcast Pressure Areas, Continued - 14220_310

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Pressure Areas - 14220_309
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Frontal Systems - 14220_311
Pressure Areas, Continued Isobars, continued Usually,  isobars  are  drawn  for  equal  intervals  of  pressure  (every  4 millibar  for  example),  and  frequently,  isobars  do  not  pass  through reporting  stations.  Isobars  never  join  or  cross.  Some  may  run  off  the chart,  but  others  may  close,  forming  irregular  ovals  that  define  the  areas of  highest  and  lowest  pressure  (fig.  10-6).  Air  (wind)  flows  from  high- pressure  areas  to  low-pressure  areas.  The  strength  of  the  wind  depends upon  two  factors:  the  amount  of  difference  in  pressure  and  the  distance of  the  high-pressure  area  (high)  from  the  low-pressure  area  (low).  These two  factors  combined  are  called  pressure  gradient.  The  greater  the gradient,  the  stronger  the  wind.  Thus,  isobars  can  give  a  rough indication  of  the  amount  of  wind.  The  closer  an  isobar  is  to  another,  the greater  the  amount  of  wind  in  that  area.  In  figure  10-7,  the  isobars represent  pressures  of  992.2  mb,  987.1  mb,  and  982.1  mb. Figure   10-7.   Isobaric   patterns. The  spacing  and  shape  of  isobars  are  seen  in  figure  10-6,  which  also shows  how  complete  isobars  are  formed.  Isobars  are  always  smoothed- out  curves,  usually  making  irregular  ovals  around  the  high-  or low-pressure  center. Refer  to  figure  10-7  and  you  can  see  that  only  part  of  each  isobar  (the upper  right  portion  of  the  oval)  appears  in  the  diagram.  In  this  pressure system,  that  area  of  greatest  pressure  is  at  the  system’s  center.  This high-pressure  area  is  also  called  a  high  or  an  anticyclone.  If  the pressure  is  992.2  mb  at  Chicago,  987.1  mb  at  Moline,  and  982.1  mb  at Logan,  the  area  of  lowest  pressure  is  in  the  vicinity  of  Logan.  This  area would  be  a  low,  or  a  cyclone. 10-14

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