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Sector Lights, Continued - 14220_119
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Quartermaster 1 & C - Military manual for the Quartermaster rate
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Buoys - 14220_121
Sector  Lights,  Continued Sector Lights, continued On  either  side  of  the  line  of  demarcation  between  colored  and  white sectors,  there  is  always  a  small  sector  whose  color  is  doubtful  because the  edges  of  a  sector  cannot  be  cut  off  sharply.  Under  some atmospheric  conditions,  a  white  light  may  have  a  reddish  appearance. Consequently,  light  sectors  must  not  be  relied  upon  entirely;  but  position must  be  verified  repeatedly  by  bearings  taken  on  the  light  itself  or  by other  fixed  objects. When  a  light  is  cut  off  (obscured)  by  adjoining  land,  the  arc  of  visibility may  vary  with  a  ship’s  distance  away  from  the  light.  If  the  intervening land  is  sloping,  for  example,  the  light  may  be  visible  over  a  wider  arc from  a  far  off  ship  than  from  one  close  inshore. Emergency Lights Emergency  lights  of  reduced  intensity  are  displayed  from  many  primary lights  when  the  main  light  is  extinguished.  These  emergency  lights  may or  may  not  have  the  same  characteristic  as  the  main  light.  The characteristic  of  the  emergency  lights  are  listed  in  column  8  of  the  Light List.  Again,  refer  to  the  example  shown  in  figure  4-9  for  Cape  Henry Light  (LLNR  365). RACONs A  RACON  is  a  radar  beacon  that  produces  a  coded  response,  or  radar paint,  when  triggered  by  a  radar  signal.  The  coded  response  appears  on your  radar  screen  as  a  series  of  dots  and  dashes.  RACONs  are  placed on  important  ATONs  (buoys  or  structures)  to  assist  in  positive identification  of  the  aid.  Column  8  of  the  Light  List  will  describe  the RACON  signal  both  as  a  Morse  code  letter  and  the  equivalent  dots  and dashes,  for  example  RACON:  X  (-..-). 4-22

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