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Azimuth by Polaris - 14221_267
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Amplitude of the Sun, Continued - 14221_269
Amplitude of the Sun Amplitude An  amplitude  of  the  Sun  or  other  celestial  body  can  be  used  to determine  gyro  error.  An  amplitude  (A)  is  the  arc  of  the  horizon between  the  prime  vertical  circle  (the  vertical  circle  through  the  east  end west  points  of  the  horizon)  and  the  observed  body.  The  prime  vertical circle  may  be  true  or  magnetic  depending  upon  which  east  or  west points  are  involved.  If  the  body  is  observed  when  its  center  is  on  the celestial  horizon,  the  amplitude  can  be  taken  directly  from  table  27  of Bowditch,  Volume  II. Horizions The  celestial  horizon  differs  from  the  one  you  see  (the  visible  horizon) because  it  runs  through  the  center  of  Earth.  There  are  a  lot  of computations  that  must  be  done  to  determine  the  celestial  horizon  of  a body,  but  for  now  we  will  just  say  that  it  is  the  horizon  that  a  navigator uses  for  all  celestial  computations. When  the  center  of  the  Sun  is  on  the  celestial  horizon,  its  lower  limb (lower  edge)  is  about  two-thirds  of  the  diameter  of  the  Sun  above  the visible  horizon.  When  the  center  of  the  Moon  is  on  the  celestial horizon,  its  upper  limb  (upper  edge)  is  on  the  visible  horizon. Figure  9-6  shows  the  relationship  of  the  visible  horizon  to  the  celestial horizon.  When  planets  and  stars  are  on  the  celestial  horizon,  they  are  a little  more  than  one  Sun  diameter  above  the  visible  horizon. Figure  9-6.  The  visible  and  celestial  horizons. 9-12

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