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Atmospheric Pressure - 14221_307
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Quartermaster 3 & 2 - Military manual for the Quartermaster rate
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Pressure Areas - 14221_309
Atmospheric Pressure,  Continued Aneroid Figure  10-4  shows  comparative Barometer, readings  on  the  inch  and  millibar continued scales. The  aneroid  barometers  normally can  be  read  no  closer  than  0.01 inch. Aneroid  barometers  are  the  standard pressure-indicating   instrument aboard  ship  and  the  type  of barometers  that  Quartermasters  will encounter  most  frequently. Barometers  should  be  calibrated yearly  in  accordance  with  PMS. Figure  10-4.  Inches  and  millibars. Significance  of A  chart  of  the  atmospheric  pressure  over  a  large  area  of  Earth  as  surface Pressure at  any  given  time  tells  you  which  way  different  air  masses  (an  air  mass is  a  large  body  of  air  that  has  common  temperature  and  humidity characteristics)  are  moving.  Some  air  masses  originate  in  the  cold  polar regions;  some,  in  the  tropics.  By  the  time  they  reach  you,  these  air masses,  called  maritime  air  masses,  have  moved  from  vast  bodies  of water.  Others,  called  continental  air  masses,  have  grown  up  over  more or  less  dry  land.  Air  masses  carry  along  with  them  the  temperature  and humidity  characteristics  of  the  areas  they  crossed.  Where  distinctly different  air  masses  touch,  the  boundary  between  them  is  called  a  front and  is  marked  by  cloudiness  and  precipitation. 10-12

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