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Frontal  Systems,  Continued - 14221_312
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Frontal  Systems,  Continued - 14221_314
Frontal  Systems,  Continued Cold  Fronts Cold  fronts  are  normally  located  in  well-deemed  pressure  troughs whenever  there  is  a  marked  temperature  contrast  between  two  air masses.  In  most  cases,  a  careful  analysis  of  the  isobars  indicates  the correct  position  of  the  pressure  trough  that  contains  the  front.  This method  of  isobaric  analysis  is  frequently  the  only  possible  means  of locating  fronts  over  ocean  areas  or  regions  of  scanty  surface  reports. Other  indications  of  cold  fronts  can  be  classified  as  prefrontal,  frontal,  or postfrontal  as  follows: 1.  Pressure  tendencies.  In  advance  of  cold  fronts,  the  tendency characteristic  is  usually  indicated  by  a  steady  or  unsteady  fall.  The isobars  of  falling  pressure  in  advance  of  the  front  usually  form  an elongated  pattern  approximately  parallel  to  the  front.  After  passage  of the  front,  the  tendency  generally  shows  a  steady  rise. 2.  Wind.  With  the  approach  of  the  front,  the  wind  is  normally  from the  south  or  southwest  in  the  Northern  Hemisphere,  veering  to  parallel the  front.  At  the  passage,  the  wind  generally  shifts  abruptly  to  the northwest.  Very  gusty  winds  frequently  occur  at  the  frontal  passage  and usually  after  passage. 3.  Cloud  forms.  In  advance  of  cold  fronts,  the  cloud  types  are  typical of  the  warm  air.  Towering  cumulus,  cumulonimbus,  stratocumulus,  and nimbostratus  are  associated  with  the  passage.  After  passage,  these  cloud forms  may  prevail  for  several  hundred  miles  with  the  slow-moving  cold front.  Very  rapid  clearing  conditions  are  associated  with  the fast-moving  cold  front  after  passage.  Well  back  in  the  cold  air  in  both types  of  cold  fronts,  the  only  clouds  normally  found  are  fair-weather cumulus. 4.   Precipitation.   Showers   and   sometimes   thunderstorms   occur   as   a cold  front  passes.  Continuous  precipitation  is  observed  for  some  hours after  passage  of  a  slow-moving  cold  front.  Showers  and  thunderstorm activity  of  short  duration  will  occur  with  the  passage  of  a  fast-moving cold  front,  followed  by  very  rapid  clearing  conditions. 10-17

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