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Pub 249 Selected Stars Worksheet
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Quartermaster 3 & 2 - Military manual for the Quartermaster rate
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Chapter 7 Tides and Currents - 14221_181
How to Determine Selected Stars using The Rude Starfinder Components The  Rude  Starfinder  is made up of a plastic star base showing stars of the northern  hemisphere  on  one  side,  and  stars  of  the  southern  hemisphere  on the  other  side,  and  10  transparent  templates.  Nine  templates  printed  in blue,  with  each  template  covering  10°  of  latitude,  labeled  5°,  15°,  25°, and  so  on,  plus  a  tenth  template  printed  in  red  showing  meridian  angle and  declination  for  use  in  the  plotting  of  planets.  Each  latitude  template has  a  family  of  altitude  curves  at  5°  intervals  from  the  horizon  to  80°. From  these  curves,  you  can  determine  the  height  of  a  star  or  planet.  A second  family  of  curves,  also  at  5°  intervals,  indicate  the  azimuth  (true bearing)  of  a  star  or  planet.  The  north-south  azimuth  line  represents  the celestial  meridian.  The  star  base,  templates,  and  a  set  of  instructions  are housed in a leatherette case. Uses The  starfinder  has  four  purposes:  to  identify  an  unknown  star,  to  select several  stars  for  observation,  to  plot  planets  for  observation,  and  identify a  star’s  magnitude.  For  example,  when  taking  sights  for  evening  stars, you shoot a star or planet that is not part of your selected stars list obtained  from  Pub  249.  You  can  identify  the  celestial  body  using  the starfinder.  This  proves  to  be  extremely  useful  when  overcast  weather conditions exists. Using the Starfinder Follow the steps in the table to create a list of selected stars for observation.  Refer  to  the  instructions  that  are  included  with  the  star finder to identify an unknown body. Step Action 1. Find  the  LHA  of  Aries  for  star  time,  follow  steps  1  through  7 on pages 6-12. 2. Place  the  template  for  the  latitude  closest  to  the  DR  latitude  on the star base. 3. Move  the  pointer  to  the  correct  LHA. 4. Select  eight  stars  that  provide  360°  of  coverage  at  intervals  of about  20°. 5. Record  the  height  and  azimuth  of  each  star.  It  will  be  helpful to list stars in the order of increasing azimuth. Example:  Vega  019°  T,  Arcturus  043°  T,  and  so  on. 6-14

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