Quantcast How to Extract Latitude and Longitude from a Known Position - 14221_38

Click Here to
Order this information in Print

Click Here to
Order this information on CD-ROM

Click Here to
Download this information in PDF Format

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: How to Extract Latitude and Longitude from a Known Position
Back | Up | Next

Click here for a printable version

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Combat
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
USMC
   
Products
  Educational CD-ROM's
Printed Manuals
Downloadable Books

   


 

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Back
How to Plot a Position - 14221_37
Up
Quartermaster 3 & 2 - Military manual for the Quartermaster rate
Next
Defense Mapping Agency - 14221_39
How to Extract Latitude and Longitude from a Known Position You  have  now  learned  how  to  plot  a  position.  Now  let’s  extract  the latitude  and  longitude  from  a  known  position.  Let’s  find  the  position  of the  fix  labeled  1520  in  figure  1-15  .  This  is  easily  accomplished  by following  these  steps: 1.  Place  the  point  of  the  compass  directly  beneath  the  position  to  be extracted  on  the  closest  parallel.  Now  open  the  compass  and  swing  an arc  that  passes  through  the  position. 2.  Move  your  compass  over  to  the  latitude  and  read  the  latitude  from the  scale.  Now  repeat  the  procedure  using  the  closest  meridian  as  a reference. You  have  now  learned  how  to  plot  and  extract  positions  on  the  chart. Hopefully,  the  previous  discussion  on  the  terrestrial  coordinate  system  is now  clear.  If  not,  now  is  a  good  time  to  review  the  material  once  again. Let’s  continue  to  take  a  closer  look  at  our  chart,  where  it  comes  from, how it is kept up to date. Figure 1-15. That’s it, the point where the two arcs intersect is the position. 1-22

Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us - Support Integrated Publishing

Integrated Publishing, Inc.