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Latitude by Local Apparent Noon (LAN) - 14221_292
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Latitude by Local Apparent Noon (LAN), Continued - 14221_294
Latitude by Local Apparent Noon (LAN), Continued Taking Sights to Up  to  this  point  we  have  learned  how  to  find  the  time  that  the  Sun Observe LAN should  be  directly  overhead.  Now  we  need  to  know  how  to  observe LAN.  We  will  discuss  two  methods.  The  first  is  called  following  to maximum  altitude;  the  second  is  called  numerous  sights. Following to Maximum Altitude The  oldest  method  of  determining  meridian  altitude  of  the  Sun,  and  the one  used  most  commonly,  is  known  as  following  to  maximum  altitude. It  is  recommended  because  of  its  adaptability  to  various  conditions,  and because  its  use  develops  an  insight  into  how  the  altitude  varies  near  the time  of  apparent  noon. At  approximately  10  minutes  before  watch  time  of  LAN,  the  observer contacts  the  Sun’s  lower  limb  with  the  horizon  in  the  sextant.  He/she then  swings  the  sextant  from  side  to  side,  and  adjusts  it  until  the  Sun, seen  moving  in  an  arc,  just  touches  the  horizon  at  the  lowest  part  of  the arc.  This  procedure  is  known  as  swinging  the  arc,  which  was  described earlier  in  this  chapter. As  the  Sun  continues  rising,  a  widening  space  appears  between  its  lower limb  and  the  horizon.  By  turning  the  micrometer  drum,  the  observer keeps  this  space  closed  and  maintains  the  Sun  in  contact  with  the horizon.  The  change  in  altitude  becomes  slower  and  slower,  until  the Sun  "hangs".  While  it  is  hanging,  the  observer  swings  the  sextant  to make  certain  of  accurate  contact  with  the  horizon.  He/she  continues  the observations  until  the  Sun  dips,  which  is  a  signal  that  the  Sun  is beginning  to  lose  altitude.  The  sextant  then  shows  the  maximum altitude  attained. 9-37

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