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Precision  Anchoring,  Continued - 14221_389
Precision  Anchoring,  Continued Selecting an Anchorage Even  when  an  anchorage  has  been  specified  by  higher  authority,  the commanding  officer  is  ultimately  responsible  for  the  safety  of  the  ship. The  commanding  officer  has  the  choice  of  refusing  to  anchor  at  the location  assigned  if  he  or  she  judges  it  to  be  unsafe.  In  these circumstances,  the  commanding  officer  should  request  an  alternate location  less  exposed  to  hazards. Many  of  the  coastal  charts  of  the  United  States  and  its  possessions drawn  up  by  the  National  Ocean  Survey  contain  colored  anchorage circles  and  anchor  symbols  of  various  sizes  for  different  types  of  ships. The  circles  are  located  on  the  chart  in  those  areas  best  suited  for anchoring,  taking  into  account  the  factors  listed  above.  These  circles and  symbols  are  lettered  and  numbered,  allowing  a  particular  berth  to  be specified.  Foreign  charts  often  have  anchorage  areas  specified  as  well. Amplifying  information  on  possible  anchorage  sites  can  be  obtained from  the  applicable  volume  of  the  Coast  Pilots,  for  U.S.  waters;  from the  proper  volume  of  the  En-Route  Sailing  Directions,  for  foreign waters;  and  from  the  Fleet  Guide,  for  ports  in  foreign  or  domestic waters  frequented  by  U.S.  Navy  ships. When  it  is  desired  to  anchor  at  a  location  other  than  that  shown  as  an anchorage  berth  on  a  chart,  the  anchorage  is  normally  specified  by giving  the  range  and  bearing  to  it  from  a  charted  reference  point,  along with  the  radius  of  the  berth. 12-14

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