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Intracoastal Waterway
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Quartermaster 3 & 2 - Military manual for the Quartermaster rate
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Steering and Sailing Rules - 14221_137
Rules of the Road Background Information As  a  Quartermaster,  you  are  required  to  know  how  to  operate  your ship's  sound  signaling  equipment.  You  must  also  be  able  to  interpret whistle  and  bell  signals  as  they  apply  to  the  rules  of  the  road.  The  rules of  the  road  are  published  by  the  Coast  Guard  in  a  booklet  entitled Navigation   Rules   (COMDINST   Ml6672.2B). International  Rules  are  specific  rules  for  all  vessels  on  the  high  seas  and in  connecting  waters  navigable  by  seagoing  vessels.  The  Inland  Rules apply  to  all  vessels  upon  the  inland  waters  of  the  United  States  and  to vessels  of  the  United  States  on  the  Canadian  waters  of  the  Great  Lakes to  the  extent  that  there  is  no  conflict  with  Canadian  law. The  International  Rules  were  formalized  at  the  convention  on  the International  Regulations  for  Preventing  Collisions  at  Sea,  1972.  These rules  are  commonly  called  72  COLREGS.  The  Inland  Rules  discussed in  this  chapter  replace  the  old  Inland  Rules,  Western  River  Rules,  Great Lakes  Rules,  their  respective  pilot  rules,  and  parts  of  the  Motorboat  Act of  1940.  Many  of  the  old  navigation  rules  were  originally  enacted  in  the last  century.  Occasionally,  provisions  were  added  to  cope  with  the increasing  complexities  of  water  transportation.  Eventually,  the navigation  rules  for  the  United  States  inland  waterways  became  such  a confusing  patchwork  of  requirements  that  in  the  1960s  several unsuccessful  attempts  were  made  to  revise  and  simplify  them. Following  the  signing  of  the  72  COLREGS,  a  new  effort  was  made  to unify  and  update  the  various  Inland  Rules.  This  effort  was  also  aimed  at making  the  Inland  Rules  as  similar  as  possible  to  the  72  COLREGS. The  Inland  Navigation  Rules  of  1980,  now  in  effect,  are  the  result.  The International/Inland  Rules  contain  38  rules  that  comprise  the  main  body of  the  Rules  and  five  annexes  which  are  the  regulations.  The International/Inland  Rules  are  broken  down  in  parts  as  follows: A-General B-Steering  and  Sailing  Rules C-Lights  and  Shapes D-Sound  and  Light  Signals E-Exemptions 4-38

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