Quantcast Time and Date for Ships at Sea - 14221_159

Click Here to
Order this information in Print

Click Here to
Order this information on CD-ROM

Click Here to
Download this information in PDF Format

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: Time and Date for Ships at Sea
Back | Up | Next

Click here for a printable version

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Combat
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
USMC
   
Products
  Educational CD-ROM's
Printed Manuals
Downloadable Books

   


 

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Back
How to Convert Time, Continued - 14221_158
Up
Quartermaster 3 & 2 - Military manual for the Quartermaster rate
Next
Timepieces - 14221_160
Time and Date for Ships at Sea Ship’s Clocks As your ship travels east or west at sea and passes between one time zone and the next, it is convenient for you (and everyone else on board) to adjust the ship’s clocks to the time zone where you are actually located. As  you  pass  from  one  time  zone  to  the  next,  ZT  changes  by  1  hour.  But do  you  advance  the  clocks  1  hour,  or  do  you  set  them  back  1  hour?  The rule is: If  you  are  traveling  towards  the  west,  the new ZT will be 1 hour earlier; therefore, you must set the ship’s clocks back 1 hour. If  you  are  traveling  towards  the  east,  ZT  will  be  1  hour  later;  therefore, you  must  set  the  ship’s  clocks  ahead  1  hour. The ship’s navigator or quartermaster should notify the commanding officer  when  these  changes  become  necessary.  Do  NOT,  in  any  case,  ever advance or retard the ship’s chronometer. International Date  Line So far we’ve been talking about advancing or retarding clocks to account for  time  zone  changes  as  we  travel  over  the  oceans.  Suppose  your  ship  is in  the  Pacific  Ocean  traveling  west.  As  you  continue  to  travel  west,  you are setting your clocks back 1 hour each time you enter a new time zone. Eventually, you will lose 24 hours in a circumnavigation of the Earth. Because of this, a method for adjusting for the day lost (or gained when you were traveling east) is necessary and is accomplished by the International  Date  Line,  which  follows  the  180th  meridian.  The  rule  for changing date when crossing the International Date Line is: When  traveling  east  and  crossing  the  International  Date  Line,  you compensate by retarding the date 1 day. When  traveling  west  and  crossing  the  International  Date  Line,  you compensate by advancing the date 1 day. Note:  The  date  change  is  in  the  opposite  direction  to  the  hour  changes you  made  as  you  passed  into  each  new  time  zone.  This  date  change  is made  by  every  vessel  that  crosses  the  International  Date  Line,  regardless of the length of the voyage. The International Date Line is used as a convenience just like time zones. Changing the date should take place at a convenient time that is least disruptive to the operation of your ship. 5-13

Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us - Support Integrated Publishing

Integrated Publishing, Inc.
6230 Stone Rd, Unit Q Port Richey, FL 34668

Phone For Parts Inquiries: (727) 493-0744
Google +