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Factors Associated with Navigational Lights - 14221_117
Types of Lights and Light Structures, Continued Daybeacons There  are  many  ATONs  that  are  not  lighted,  especially  in  the  inland waters  of  the  United  States.  Structures  of  this  are  called  daybeacons (fig.  4-7).  They  are  not  buoys,  but  are  permanently  mounted  in  position. Daybeacons  vary  greatly  in  design  and  construction,  depending  on  their location  and  the  distance  from  which  they  must  be  seen.  A  daybeacon may  consist  of  a  single  pile  with  a  daymark  on  the  top,  a  multi-pile structure,  a  tower,  or  a  structure  of  masonry  or  steel.  Daybeacons  are fitted  with  reflecting  tape  to  facilitate  their  identification  by  searchlight at  night.  Daymarks  marking  the  sides  of  channels  are  colored  and numbered  in  the  same  manner  as  buoys,  with  red  even-numbered  marks indicating  a  starboard-side  channel  boundary  and  green  odd-numbered marks  on  the  portside  channel  boundary.  The  shapes  for  channel, preferred-channel,  nonlateral,  and  safe-water  daymarks,  together  with their  chart  symbols,  are  shown  in  chart  No.  1  and  on  plate  1. Minor  Lights Just  as  daybeacons  are  sometimes substituted  for  unlighted  buoys, lighted  buoys  are  often  replaced  by minor  lights  (fig.  4-8).  Minor  lights are  fixed  structures  of  the  same overall  physical  features  as daybeacons,  but  are  equipped  with lights  generally  similar  in characteristics  to  those  found  on buoys.  Minor  lights  can  be  used  in a  series  with  other  aids  to  mark channels,  rivers,  or  harbors  and  can be  used  to  mark  some  isolated areas. The  term  minor  light  does  not include  the  more  important  lights marking  harbors,  peninsulas,  major shoals,  and  so  on,  which  have  lights of  greater  intensity  and/or  special Figure  4-8.  Minor  light. characteristics  and  were  discussed  earlier  in  this  manual.  Daymarks  are placed  on  the  structures  for  identification,  and  reflective  material  is added  for  nighttime  safety  in  case  the  light  is  extinguished.  A  minor light  normally  has  the  same  color,  flash,  and  phase  characteristic  as  that of  a  lighted  buoy.  Intensity  of  the  light  is  generally  of  the  same  order  as that  of  a  lighted  buoy,  but  visibility  may  be  increased  by  its  greater height  above  water. 4-18

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