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Maintaining a Suitable Span of Control - 14237_46
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Principles of Letter Writing - 14237_48
evaluation of subordinate personnel is one of the most  difficult  aspects  of  any  supervisor’s  job. As  a  supervisor,  you  must  be  able  to  decide when  criticism  or  praise  is  due.  A  good  rule  for you  to  follow  is  to  criticize  in  private  and  to  praise in  public.  Remember,  criticism  should  be  con- structive  and  informative.  Don’t  make  the  mistake of  using  criticism  as  an  outlet  for  expressing sarcastic  comments,  degrading  your  crew,  or displaying  anger.  This  type  of  action  will  only create  hostility  and  destroy  morale.  If  you  have the right attitude, the crew will soon realize that your criticism is not to be feared but that it is given as  help  and  guidance. As  with  criticism,  there  is  an  art  to  giving praise. To be effective, praise should not be over- done.  When  individuals  are  doing  a  good  job  on routine  work,  they  need  some  words  of  en- couragement and appreciation. This will build up pride  and  self-respect-elements  that  are  necessary for maintaining good morale. But save the “well- done”  commendations  for  job  performances  that truly  merit  public  recognition. Evaluating your people is such an important part of your job as a supervisor that you should be  especially  careful  to  put  your  best  effort  for- ward.   Try   to   keep   the   work   of   each   of   your subordinates  in  perspective,  try  to  be  fair,  and always try to express any criticism or praise in a manner that will promote growth and awareness in  your  subordinates  instead  of  resentment  and bitterness. Also, you should keep in mind that a job  performance  should  be  accurately  reflected in   enlisted   evaluation   reports.   For   detailed information  on  enlisted  evaluation  procedures, you  should  consult  Military  Requirements  for Petty  Officer  First  Class  and  Military    Require- ments   for   Chief   Petty   Officer. YOUR  ABILITY  AS  A  LEADER As most experienced supervisors will tell you, you  will  never  stop  learning  how  to  become  a  good leader.  As  a  senior  Ship’s  Serviceman,  you  will now be expected to apply all the training in leader- ship  you  have  received  throughout  your  naval career.  You  will  also  be  expected  to  provide training in leadership to all of your subordinates. There  should  be  a  constant  training  program  in leadership   going   on   in   every   ship’s   service division. Your ability to lead will be most apparent in your supervision of other people. But, you should keep  in  mind  that  your  ability  as  a  leader  will manifest  itself  in  more  subtle  ways  in  almost everything  you  do.  Your  personal  example  will probably  contribute  more  to  your  success  as  a leader  than  will  any  other  single  factor.  Your attitude toward your job, your subordinates, and your seniors is sure to be contagious. By setting a  good  example,  you  can  make  your  job  as  a leader  and  as  a  supervisor  a  rewarding  experience and  the  dividends  you  derive  will  be  many. ADMINISTRATION In  any  ship’s  service  activity,  especially  in any   ship’s   store   division,   there   are   many administrative matters that must be coordinated with  the  overall  operation.  From  your  study  of Ship’s  Serviceman  3  &  2,  modules  1  and  2,  you are  probably  familiar  with  some  administrative matters, such as basic procedures concerning cor- respondence, files, and records. Now it is time for you to deal with the supervisory aspects of these matters.  You  are  now  responsible  for  initiating and  controlling  correspondence;  maintaining  files, records,  publications,  and  directives;  and  develop- ing  procedural  instructions. CORRESPONDENCE As  a  senior  Ship’s  Serviceman,  you  will  be expected to initiate routine correspondence and, on occasion, to prepare drafts of Navy directives. This  means  you  will  be  responsible  for  originating the   contents   of   letters   or   other   types   of   cor- respondence   and   for   placing   all   types   of   cor- respondence  in  their  proper  formats.  At  some activities, you may be expected to prepare smooth correspondence  from  rough  drafts  that  were prepared  by  others. The   importance   of   correctly   written   and courteous  correspondence  cannot  be  overem- phasized. Efficiency of any operation is increased if  the  communications  that  are  transmitted  within activities of the Navy are all properly prepared. Relationships between activities of the Navy are governed,  in  a  large  measure,  by  the  tone  and quality of the written communications exchanged between  them.  In  recognition  of  this,  Navy Regulations   states  that  official  correspondence shall be courteous in tone, concise, and accurate. Writing  Guides From your study of  Ship’s Serviceman 3 & 2, you   are   probably   already   familiar   with   the standard  formats  and  basic  procedures  for  the 3-19

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