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The Scope of This Rate Training Manual, Continued
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Ships Serviceman 1 & C (Revised) - How to fix and repair boats
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Supply Management
CHAPTER 2 NAVY SUPPLY SYSTEM As   a   Ship’s   Serviceman,   you   have   been involved  with  the  daily  operation  of  the  retail  and service activities of an afloat supply department. You  have  performed  duties  as  a  laundryman, barber,   tailor,   ship’s   store   operator,   bulk storeroom  custodian,  or  records  keeper.  Now,  as you  prepare  to  advance  to  a  senior  petty  officer rate  and  assume  the  added  responsibilities  of  a supervisory   position,   you   must   be   able   to identify your role in the supply department afloat and ashore as an integral part of the Navy supply system. The varied supply demands of a missile ship in  the  South  Pacific;  a  Navy  radio  station  in Cutler,  Maine;  the  naval  base  in  Guantanamo, Cuba;  and  the  other  worldwide  elements  of  the operating forces and shore establishments of the Navy   require   a   procurement,   storage,   and distribution  system  with  a  scope  unequaled  in  the commercial  world.  The  term   supply   system   is used to describe collectively the field activities of the Naval Supply Systems Command (NAVSUP) and  the  Defense  Logistics  Agency  (DLA)  which procure,  hold,  and  issue  materials  to  the  operating forces or to activities of the shore establishment. The  supply  system  also  extends  into  the  operating forces  in  the  form  of  stores  issue  ships  and tenders. The  mission  of  the  integrated  Navy/DLA supply   system   is   twofold.   First   and   always foremost,  the  supply  system  must  provide  respon- sive support to the operating forces. Second, the system   must   achieve   optimum   economy.   To accomplish  both  of  these  goals,  the  Navy/DLA supply system must obtain superior management in  all  of  its  operations.  In  your  role  as  a  senior Ship’s Serviceman, you must provide the type of management  that  will  contribute  directly  to  the success  of  the  mission  and  the  goals  of  the integrated  Navy/DLA  supply  system. The   Navy/DLA   supply   system   became   “in- tegrated”  when  the  critically  important  supply requirements  of  the  operating  forces  began  to extend beyond the scope of a single organization. In fact, the supply system has become integrated in  two  significant  ways.  First  of  all,  the  Navy supply  system  itself  is  integrated.  Before  World War II, technical materials were controlled by the technical commands and were generally provided to  the  fleet  on  a  direct  turnover  basis  from private   industry.   The   enormous   quantity   of technical materials that the highly mobile naval forces required soon surpassed the ability of that system  to  meet  the  demands.  As  a  result,  these technical items had to be integrated into a supply system  where  they  could  be  managed  systemwide. Second, the supply system is an integration of the DLA  system  and  the  Navy  system.  The  integra- tion  of  the  two  systems  began  when  the  DLA started   placing   selected   items   of   material   in various  naval  supply  centers,  depots,  shipyards, and  air  stations.  The  following  sections  of  this chapter  will  describe  how  the  general  organiza- tion  and  functions  of  the  DLA  system  and  the Navy  system  work  together. DEFENSE  LOGISTICS  AGENCY The Defense Logistics Agency was established to  procure  and  manage  certain  common  items for  all  the  military  services.  First,  each  service determines its own gross requirements. Next, the DLA totals the requirements for all the military services  and  procures  the  required  materials  on a   wholesale   basis   from   commercial   sources. Finally, the DLA sells the procured materials to the military services. DEFENSE SUPPLY CENTERS The DLA headquarters is located at Cameron Station,  Alexandria,  Virginia.  The  headquarters organization   provides   leadership   and   manage- ment   over   the   operational   functions   that   are decentralized  to  the  DLA  field  activities.  The  field activities, which are referred to as defense supply 2-1

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