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Figure 3-4.—“Before” and “after” layout charts for a laundry operation.
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Figure 3-5.—Flow process chart showing present method.
PREPARING  A  FLOW PROCESS  CHART A flow process chart, either a Single-Column Flow  Process  Chart,  NAVPERS  594,  or  a  local form,  can  help  you  to  analyze  your  work  flow. You can prepare a flow process chart for any pro- cess,  person,  or  material  you  wish  to  analyze. The  heading  of  the  chart  indicates  what  aspect of  the  operation  you  are  analyzing  and  where the  process  begins  and  ends.  You  should  then list  the  steps  that  are  involved  in  the  pro- cess  in  the  sequence  in  which  the  steps  occur under  your  present  method.  (Figure  3-5  illustrates a  method  that  is  currently  being  used  for handling  the  breakout  of  a  ship’s  store  stock.) Next,   you   should   draw   a   line   to   connect   the symbols  that  identify  what  each  step  involves. The  five  symbols  are  explained  in  the  following paragraphs. Operation—An  operation  rep- resents   a   main   step   in   the process  and  takes  place  when something   is   being   created, changed,   added   to,   or   pre- pared   for   another   step.   An operation   also   occurs   when   information is   given   or   received.   Some   examples   of   an operation  are  the  preparation  of  a  breakout document  (NAVSUP  973),  receipt  of  ship’s store   stock   into   the   bulk   storeroom,   or   the sale   of   an   item   of   merchandise   in   the   ship’s store. Transportation—Transporta- tion  is  an  auxiliary  step  that occurs   when   something   is moved   from   one   place   to another, except  when  such movement is part of an opera- tion or inspection. Some examples of transporta- tion  are  a  document  that  is  being  carried  to another  location  or  a  person  who  is  moving  to another  area  of  the  ship. Inspection—An   inspection   is an  auxiliary  step  that  occurs when   items   are   checked, verified,   reviewed,   or   ex- amined for quality or quantity. However,  the  items  inspected are  not  changed  at  this  point.  Some  examples of  inspection  are  proofreading  a  letter,  checking a   breakout   document   for   proper   signatures, or   verifying   that   a   customer’s   change   is correct. Delay—A delay is an auxiliary step  that  occurs  when  condi- tions  do  not  permit  or  require an  immediate  performance  of the  next  step.  Some  examples of  a  delay  are  a  document that  is  waiting  for  a  signature  and  a  customer who  is  waiting  in  line  at  the  ship’s  store. Storage—Storage  occurs  when something   remains   in   one place  and  is  not  being  worked on   in   a   regular   process,   or is  awaiting  further  action  at a  later  date.  Some  examples of  storage  are  a  document  that  is  held  in a  file  for  later  forwarding  with  returns  and ship’s  store  stock  that  is  stowed  in  a  store- room. USING  FLOW  PROCESS  CHARTS In  analyzing  a  flow  process  chart,  you  can determine the actions you must take to improve the sequence of any operation by asking yourself Who?,   What?,   When?,   Where?,   Why?,   and How?  You  should  make  notes  relating  to  these questions on the chart that represents your pres- ent  method  of  work  flow  (fig.  3-5).  You  will  use these  notes  for  the  development  of  a  revised  chart that  will  represent  a  proposed  method  of  work flow.  Figure  3-6  shows  a  revised  chart  that  has been  developed  from  the  present  method  chart shown in figure 3-5. You can apply flow process charting effectively to solve procedural problems created   by   changes   in   your   personnel,   your organization,  or  your  volume  of  work;  to  review your  operating  methods  periodically;  and  to establish  new  organizations. A  resale  operation,  such  as  the  prepara- tion   and   processing   of   a   breakout   document, the   movement   of   merchandise   during   receipt, or   a   cash-handling   procedure   are   all   work flow  situations  that  you  can  analyze  by  using a   flow   process   chart.   Even   if   you   decide against  using  an  actual  chart,  you  can  still improve   the   sequence   of   operations   in   any work   flow   situation   by   asking   yourself   the questions:  Who?,  What?,  Where?,  When?, Why?,  and  How? An   office   operation   can   be   analyzed   in   a similar manner. To discover any possible delays 3-8

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