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Figure 7-6.—Laundry schedule (example)
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Ships Serviceman 2 - How to fix and repair boats
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Damage to Clothing on the Wash Deck
laundry schedule is computed on a ship with 1,500 crew  members.  Your  weekly  workload  is  36,000 pounds and your daily workload is 7,200 pounds. You  are  well  within  your  laundry  capabilities because your laundry can wash and dry more than 36,000  pounds  in  a  96-hour  workweek.  Therefore, your workweek will be considerably less than 96 hours.  Your  pressing  capabilities  are  also  more than adequate. Now that you have determined your laundry capabilities,  your  next  step  would  be  to  determine the  number  of  personnel  in  each  division.  This may  be  a  difficult  task  on  a  ship  as  large  as  a carrier. The best thing to do is schedule a meeting of all divisional laundry petty officers and let them know you are preparing a new laundry schedule and that you will need to know the total number of   personnel   in   each   division.   Give   them   a deadline for giving you this information so time won’t  be  wasted.  The  divisional  laundry  petty officer may obtain the total number of personnel in  each  division  from  the  divisional  mustering petty   officer. Once you receive the information from all the divisional  laundry  petty  officers,  list  the  divisions and the number of personnel in each division as shown   in   figure   7-6.   Multiply   the   number   of personnel  in  each  division  by  24  and  this  will  give you  an  estimate  of  the  total  pounds  of  laundry you  will  receive  from  that  division  per  week. Beginning with Monday, insert a combination of bulk and individual lots until you come close to your  daily  workload  of  7,200.  Since  officer  and CPO laundry is delivered twice a week, you will multiply  the  number  of  officers  or  CPOs  by  12 instead  of  24  as  shown  in  figure  7-6.  Divisional laundry  can  be  done  in  this  fashion  also.  Look at Division F in figure 7-6. Notice how Division F’s laundry is delivered twice a week instead of once.  In  this  case,  multiply  the  total  number  of personnel in Division F by 12 instead of 24 on the days  they  will  deliver  their  laundry.  Continue  the process of inserting divisions in one of the days until  all  bulk  and  individual  lots  are  accounted for  and  you  have  your  laundry  schedule. Your   laundry   schedule   should   show   such things as (1) type of lot, (2) individuals and groups to  whom  the  lots  belong,  (3)  personnel  who  deliver the lots, (4) day and hour of delivery, and (5) hour of   pickup.   Your   schedule   should   also   include accompanying   instructions   showing   method   of delivery,  services  rendered,  and  any  other information  necessary. Aboard ship in port, you can normally expect a  workload  that  is  equal  to  one-half  of  your underway  workload.  Changing  conditions  such as underway periods should have a limited effect on  your  laundry  schedule  when  the  above scheduling  method  is  used. DAMAGE  TO  LAUNDERED  ITEMS As  the  laundry  supervisor,  familiarize  yourself with  the  causes  of  clothing  damage  and  take preventive  measures  to  eliminate  these  causes. Careful attention to detail will eliminate claims for  damage  to  clothing  in  the  laundry.  Many reasons why clothing is damaged in the laundry are  listed  below: Not   conforming   to   the   Navy   wash formulas Using   the   washer   extractor   in   manual mode  instead  of  automatic Overloading  washers  and  dryers Not  sorting  clothes  properly Overextracting   clothing   in   the   washer/ extractor Water  temperature  set  too  high Water  levels  too  low Overdrying Items such as pens, gum, and so forth, left in  pockets  of  shirts  or  pants Burning or scorching clothing on presses Pressing  clothing  that  is  too  wet Dryer  fires Improper  padding  of  presses DAMAGE  TO  CLOTHING  DURING THE RECEIVING PROCESS During  the  receiving  process  many  problem areas   can   be   identified   and   corrected   before routing  lots  to  the  wash  deck.  After  properly identifying  all  clothing  as  discussed  in  Ship’s Serviceman Third Class, NAVEDTRA 10176, you should quickly check all pockets of the shirts and 7-8

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