Quantcast Appendix 1, Continued - 14239_172

Click Here to
Order this information in Print

Click Here to
Order this information on CD-ROM

Click Here to
Download this information in PDF Format

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: 14239_172
Back | Up | Next

Click here for a printable version

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Combat
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
USMC
   
Products
  Educational CD-ROM's
Printed Manuals
Downloadable Books

   


 

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Back
Appendix 1, Continued - 14239_171
Up
Ships Serviceman 3 - How to fix and repair boats
Next
Appendix 1, Continued - 14239_173
HYDROFLUORIC   ACID—A   compound commonly  referred  to  as  rust  remover,  it  is  a colorless, volatile, fuming, corrosive acid used to removed  rust  and  tannin  stains  from  clothing. HYDROGEN  PEROXIDE—A  mild  liquid oxidizing  bleach  used  chiefly  for  removal  of organic  stains  such  as  bloodstains. INACTIVE PHASE—A phase within the life cycle of bacteria during which they are not active or  reproducing  but  are  not  dead  either.  Instead of  remaining  active  or  dying,  the  bacteria  are rendered helpless while the area in which they are located is kept sanitized. The bacteria survive by forming a tough outer shell and are not affected by  disinfectants,  heat,  or  cold.  Once  the  area  is not   sanitized   or   conditions   become   favorable again,   these   inactive   cells   become   active   and reproduce  again. INCINERATOR—A   furnace   or   container used  to  burn  waste  materials. INDIVIDUAL   LOTS—Lots   of   laundry including officer and chief petty officer personal clothing normally delivered to the laundry in net bags. INSOLUBLE   SOILS—Soils   such   as   earth, concrete, dust, sand, carbon, ashes, lint, hair, and so forth. These types of soil are insoluble in water or  chemical  solvents.  Most  insoluble  soils  are dispersed  during  the  wash  cycle  and  complete removal  is  difficult  because  these  soils  may redeposit on the clothes, causing a gray look on the  fabric. INTERLOCK   SWITCH—Switch   that prevents the wash motor of the washer extractor from  activating  while  the  outer  shell  door  is open. INTRASTORE   TRANSFER—A   movement of  material  from  the  responsibility  of  one  sales outlet  operator  to  that  of  another. INVENTORY—The   process   of   identifying, counting,  and  evaluating  all  stock  on  hand  at  a specific  time. INVENTORY   TEAM—A   team   normally consisting  of  two  persons;  one  person  counts  while the other records those counts on the Inventory Count  Sheet,  NAVSUP  Form  238. ISSUE—An  expenditure  of  stock  for  some further  purpose.  Issues  reduce  accountability. JOG  SWITCH—A  switch  that  is  depressed simultaneously  with  the  reverse  or  forward  switch on the washer extractor to rotate the cylinder of the washer to the proper position for loading or unloading. LAUNDRY   BASKETS—Baskets   used   to transport  clothing  from  one  work  station  in  the ship’s  laundry  to  another. LAUNDRY   MARK—Mark   placed   on   cloth- ing  for  identification  purposes.  The  mark  includes the first letter of the individual’s last name plus the  last  four  numbers  of  the  individual’s  social security  number. LAUNDRY  SHIFT—A  period  normally  last- ing 8 hours with 3 shifts per day. Normally done in  shipboard  laundries  that  require  operation  past normal  working  hours  to  complete  the  laundry. LAUNDRY   SUMMARY   SHEET—A   record used to summarize what the laundry accomplished during a weekly period; includes pounds washed, pieces pressed, and supplies usage data. LAUNDRY   WORKFLOW—Routing   laundry from one work station to another for the purpose of   efficient   production. LAYOUT  SKETCH—Sketch  of  each  sales outlet and bulk storeroom prepared by the ship’s store officer including each bin, shelf, showcase, and so forth, in each space identified by a number. LINT  SCREEN—A  rectangular-shaped  screen that  catches  lint  and  dirt;  located  in  the  lower portion  of  the  tumbler  dryer;  referred  to  as  the primary  lint  trap. LINT   TRAP   BAGS—Fine   mesh   bags available  through  the  Ship’s   Store   Contract Bulletin;  used  normally  on  secondary  lint  traps to catch lint and dirt before they enter the exhaust duct  from  the  tumbler  dryer. LINT  TRAPDOOR—A  door  that  provides access  to  the  lint  screen;  located  on  the  lower  part of  the  tumbler  dryer. LOAD   LIMITS—The   maximum   amount   of clothes in pounds that may be placed in a piece of   equipment   based   on   manufacturer’s recommendation  and  washing  formulas. AI-6

Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us - Support Integrated Publishing

Integrated Publishing, Inc.