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Ships Serviceman 3 - How to fix and repair boats
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Naval Supply Systems Command
CHAPTER  1 ORGANIZATION  AND  SECURITY This  training  manual  has  been  prepared  for members of the Regular Navy and Naval Reserve in  the  Ship’s  Serviceman  (SH)  rating  who  are preparing for advancement to Ship’s Serviceman third  class  (SH3). Ship’s Servicemen operate and manage resale activities  such  as  ship’s  stores,  commissary  stores, and Navy exchanges; service activities of the ship’s stores and Navy exchanges such as laundry and dry-cleaning  facilities,  vending  machines,  snack bars, and barbershops; and they perform clerical and  stock  control  functions  for  all  activities operated. As an SH3, you will work primarily as a sales outlet   operator, bulk  storeroom  custodian, barber,  or  laundryman.  The  majority  of  these billets are aboard ship, so the afloat procedures should  be  your  main  concern. To  be  successful  in  this  rating,  you  must possess  certain  personal  characteristics.  You should  like  dealing  with  people,  have  a  good speaking  ability,  possess  above  average  arithmetic skills,  and  have  basic  recordskeeping  abilities. Getting  along  with  people  deals  with  customer service   which   is   completely   covered   in   the Navy  Customer  Service  Manual,  NAVEDTRA 10119-B,   and   therefore,   material   already   in- cluded in that manual will not be covered in this manual. The  material  covered  in  this  manual  is  the minimum required of an SH3 to perform the job properly.  These  are  the  minimum  requirements based  on  the  occupational  standards  for  SH3, which can be found in the current advancement handbook  for  Ship’s  Servicemen. SUPPLY   AUTOMATION The  Navy  has  developed  many  new  systems to  make  the  job  of  supply  personnel  easier. Recently,  the  Navy  developed  a  system  for  the automation of ship’s store records. It is called the Resale  Operations  Management  (ROM)  system. The  ROM  system  has  been  successfully  tested  and used  aboard  ship.  It  has  proven  to  enhance  the accuracy   and   timeliness   of   doing   ship’s   store records.  The  system  makes  the  SH’s  job  easier because  it  does  much  of  the  work  the  SH  used to  do  by  hand. The  ROM  system   Terminal   User’s   Guide (TUG)  is  the  computer  system  reference  book providing detailed information on how to operate the ROM. This publication was developed by and is  available  free  from  the  Navy  Management Systems  Support  Office  (NAVMASSO)  located in  Norfolk,  Virginia.  NAVMASSO  has  also published  a  Resale   Operations   Management (ROM)  Desk  Top  Guide  which  is  a  supplement to  the  ROM  TUG.  It  is  exclusively  made  up  of job sheets. Each job sheet contains a step-by-step guide  in  performing  a  ROM  function.  Although the   occupational   standards   for   SH3   do   not indicate the use of the ROM system, many of the tasks  performed  by  an  SH3  will  be  centered around  the  ROM  system.  Throughout  this  manual you may see the terms  manual    recordskeeping, ROM  procedures,   and  ROM  users.  The   term manual  recordskeeping  relates  to  performing  a task without the use of the ROM system. The term ROM procedures or ROM users is used to indicate that  the  procedures  being  discussed  are  done using  the  ROM  system. THE  SUPPLY  SYSTEM Today’s  Navy  requires  millions  of  items  to maintain  its  operational  readiness.  The  supply system  supports  these  material  needs.  The  supply system  is  composed  of  a  group  of  activities  that is  responsible  for  procurement,  distribution, inventory  control,  and  stowage  of  all  materials except  ammunition. In this chapter you will learn the basics of the supply  system  and  the  organization  of  supply department afloat. You will become familiar with supply department security regulations that you must  observe  in  performing  your  everyday  duties. 1-1

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