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Figure 3-5. Tax-Free Cigarette Inventory, NAVSUP Form 1234
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Ships Serviceman 3 - How to fix and repair boats
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Markings of Stock
when  stowing  ship’s  store  stock.  Some  of  these fundamental; are required and some are effective methods  that  have  been  used  before  in  stowage operations.   Although   they   have   proven   to   be effective,  knowledge  and  experience  in  using  these fundamentals  afford  the  custodian  of  the  bulk storeroom   the   skills   required   to   stow   stock properly. SAFETY Safety  cannot  be  overemphasized  in  any  phase of  the  ship’s  store  operation  and  especially  in storeroom  stowage.  The  safety  precautions  for storeroom  stowage  are  contained  in  the  Navy Safety  Precautions  for  Forces  Afloat,  OPNAV- INST  5100.19,  chapter  2,  “Storeroom  Stowage.” As  the  bulk  storeroom  custodian,  you  should  be familiar with these safety precautions and make sure they are carried out in the bulk storeroom. The   ship’s   store   officer   is   responsible   for preparing appropriate safety precautions for the bulk storeroom. These safety precautions should be  posted  inside  the  bulk  storeroom  in  plain  view. MANUAL   HANDLING All  storeroom  custodians  should  have  a  pair of leather work gloves because much of the work done  inside  the  storerooms  requires  manual handling   of   stock   due   to   limited   space.   It   is important   that   you   understand   how   to   lift correctly  because  many  times  custodians  do  not think  about  how  to  lift  or  handle  materials. The results of improper handling of materials may result in a painful hernia, a strained or pulled muscle,  or  a  disk  lesion.  The  correct  method  of lifting objects is shown in figure 3-6. You should observe  the  following  rules  and  precautions  for lifting: 1. Do NOT lift an object if it is too heavy or too  bulky  for  good  balance.  Get  help  or  use mechanical  aids  such  as  a  dolly  or  hand  truck. 2.  Keep  the  load  close  to  the  center  of  your body.  The  farther  the  load  is  from  the  small  of your  back,  the  greater  the  strain.  That  is  the reason a heavy compact load is easier to lift than a  bulky,  lighter  load—you  just  cannot  get  the bulky object close to you. The best way to handle a compact load is to squat down close to the load with  one  foot  alongside  it  and  the  other  foot behind it. With the feet comfortably spread, you will have better stability with the rear foot in the position  for  the  upward  thrust  of  the  lift. Figure  3-6.-Manual  lifting. 3.  Pull  the  load  toward  you,  then  lift  it gradually.  Avoid  quick  and  jerky  motions.  Push up on your legs while keeping your back straight. A straight back keeps the spine, back muscles, and other organs of the body in the correct alignment. Tucking in your chin helps to align the spine. No matter what size the load, get as close to it as you can; then get a good grip by using the full palm and extending your fingers and hands around the object.  Remember  that  your  fingers  have  very little power and need the strength of your entire hand. Keep your arms and elbows tucked into the side  of  your  body  to  help  keep  the  body  weight centered. Avoid twisting your body during the lift or  while  moving  the  load;  change  directions  by moving  your  feet.  Twisting  your  body  during  a lift  is  one  of  the  most  common  causes  of  back injury. 4. Be sure to have a clear vision over the load you  are  handling. 5.  Do  NOT  change  your  grip  while  carrying the  load. 6.  Face  the  spot  in  which  you  intend  to  set the  object  down;  bend  your  knees  keeping  your back as straight as possible and the weight of the object  close  to  your  body. 7. Always allow enough room for the load to prevent  injury  to  your  toes  and  fingers. 8.  When  you  are  placing  a  load  on  the  table or  bench,  set  it  down  on  the  edge  and  push  it forward with your arms and body. If the load is too  heavy  or  too  awkward  for  you  to  move alone—GET   HELP!   Remember:   LIFT   WITH YOUR  LEGS,  NOT  YOUR  BACK! 3-11

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