Quantcast Table  6-2.—Basic  Stain  Groups

Click Here to
Order this information in Print

Click Here to
Order this information on CD-ROM

Click Here to
Download this information in PDF Format

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: 14239_157
Back | Up | Next

Click here for a printable version

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Combat
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
USMC
   
Products
  Educational CD-ROM's
Printed Manuals
Downloadable Books

   


 

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Back
Maintenance of Dry-Cleaning Presses
Up
Ships Serviceman 3 - How to fix and repair boats
Next
Spotting Tools and Equipment
Adhesive  Tape Airplane   Dope Asphalt Carbon   Paper Crayon Furniture  Polish Glue Grass Gravy Grease Hair  Dressing Ink,  Ball  Pen Albumin Blood Candy Catsup Chocolate Cocoa Discharge Beer Berry Coffee Fruit Rust Dyes Ink,  writing Table  6-2.—Basic  Stain  Groups OIL  BASE  TYPE Ink,  Marking Ink,  Printing Lacquer Leather Lipstick Lotions Mascara Nail  Polish Oil Ointments Paint,  Latex Paint,  Plastic PROTEIN   TYPE Egg Glue   (Animal) Ice  Cream Jelly Mayonnaise Mercurochrome Merthiolate TANNIN  TYPE Fruit Juice Liquor Perfume Soft  Drinks MISCELLANEOUS Metallic (Other Than Rust) Silver Nitrate Photo   Developer Tarnish specialized  art  in  which  a  spot  or  stain is   identified   and   removed   using   the   proper chemical  agent  without  damaging  or  affecting the  clothing.  Aboard  ship,  basic  spotting chemical   preparations,   which   we   will   discuss later,   should   be   used   for   removing   stains contained   in   the   basic   stain   groups   shown in   table   6-2.   Stains   are   easier   to   remove when   they   are   fresh   and,   therefore,   early identification  is  essential. Pitch Rouge Rubber  Cement Sauces Shellac Shoe  Polish Soot Soup Tar Varnish w a x Milk Perspiration Salad Dressing Starch Sweets Syrup Vomit Tea Tobacco Wine Yellow THE  SPOTTER The  person  who  does  the  actual  spotting  is called the spotter. The spotter’s job is to identify the substance that caused the spot or stain and to   know   what   cleaning   agents   and   type   of treatment to use to remove it. Many of the fabrics the  spotter  handles  are  expensive.  Serious  damage to  any  of  them  means  financial  loss  as  well  as inconvenience  to  the  owner.  Therefore,  the  spotter 6-21

Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us - Support Integrated Publishing

Integrated Publishing, Inc.