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Storeroom Maintenance
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Special Stowage of Ship's Store Stock
Ventilation  and  Humidity  Control All  storerooms  must  be  well  ventilated  to prevent  excessive  heat  and  humidity  because  high temperature   and   humidity   encourage   bacteria growth  and  insect  infestation.  In  addition,  high humidity can result in mold and mildew and may cause mustiness in cookies, crackers, and tobacco products.  Of  course  you  have  no  control  over storeroom  location,  but  you  are  responsible  for making  sure  space  is  left  between  cases  and structural  obstructions  such  as  steam  pipes  to permit  maximum  ventilation.  When  possible,  bulk storerooms  will  be  ventilated  once  a  week  to permit air circulation and to remove stagnant air that  can  cause  damage  to  perishable  items. STOREROOM  SECURITY Security  of  the  bulk  storeroom  has  been mentioned  several  times  in  this  chapter  but security  cannot  be  overemphasized.  No  matter how well you fulfill other requirements for good stowage, without proper security your efforts will be  useless.  Security  is  not  only  important  from a   standpoint   of   preventing   unauthorized   use, pilferage,  and  theft  of  stock,  it  also  prevents damage  to  stock  and  storeroom  facilities  and hazards to personnel and the ship due to improper stowage. SPECIAL   STOWAGE Most items of supply are of such a nature that special  stowage  is  not  required.  However,  there are some items that require special considerations. For instance, some materials have characteristics that require the materials to be specially stowed or  handled  to  prevent  a  hazard  to  personnel  or facilities. Other materials require a high degree of protection because they have a limited stowage life and care must be taken to make sure the oldest stock  or  that  which  may  have  an  earlier  manu- facture  date  is  issued  first.  Also  many  foods  or confections  must  be  stowed  in  areas  where  the temperature   can   be   controlled   to   prevent deterioration.   When   planning   the   stowage   of ship’s   store   items,   you   must   recognize   these factors  and  take  appropriate  action. HAZARDOUS    MATERIALS Certain  materials  with  inherent  hazardous properties  require  special  stowage  facilities  and handling precautions. The Naval Ships’ Technical Manual,  chapter  670,  and  the   Consolidated Hazardous  Item  List  (CHIL),   NAVSUP   P-4500 (now  known  as  the  Hazardous   Materials Information  System  (HMIS)  List,  DOD   6050.5) outline   the   requirements   for   stowage   of dangerous, semisafe, and safe materials and list these  materials  under  each  classification. Dangerous Materials Dangerous  materials  include  all  types  of compressed  gases  and  materials  that  present  a considerable  fire  hazard  or  other  dangerous characteristics.  These  materials  must  be  stowed in a cage within the paint and flammable liquid storerooms with access limited to the responsible custodian.  Paint  and  oil  constitute  the  bulk  of material in this category that is stocked. The paint and  flammable  liquid  storerooms  are  normally provided  with  sprinklers  and  CO2 smothering systems   that   may   be   activated   by   automatic temperature   sensitive   devices   inside   the storerooms  and  by  manual  controls  outside  the storerooms. A flooding system operated manually outside  the  storerooms  is  an  additional  safety factor.  When  practical,  these  storerooms  are located below the full load waterline, near either end of the vessel, and not adjacent to a magazine. They are equipped with watertight doors that must be  locked  and  dogged  when  not  in  use. Semisafe Materials Semisafe  materials  include  linseed  oil,  paints, and metal polish. These materials are considered safe  as  long  as  the  containers  have  not  been opened  and  do  not  leak.  Any  leakage  must  be cleaned  up  promptly  and  also  the  leaking  or opened  container  issued  for  use  or  otherwise disposed  of.  All  semisafe  materials  must  be stowed   in   the   paint   and   flammable   liquids storeroom. Safe Materials Safe  materials  include  deck  wax,  furniture polish, and laundry blue. Safe materials are not subject  to  spontaneous  combustion  and  present no particular hazard due to reactions that might arise  from  broken  containers.  No  special  stowage, fire  protection,  or  ventilation  is  needed  for  safe materials. 3 - 1 4

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