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Figure 9-11.—Special labels required for shipments under MILSTAMP.
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Storekeeper 1 & C - Manual for watching over inventory and other things needed in a store
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Applications of SNAP I
CHAPTER 10 AUTOMATED SUPPLY PROCEDURES In   the   previous   chapters,   we   covered   the various   functions   of   the   manual   supply   pro- cedures.  Now  we  will  discuss  how  automation plays an important role in shipboard supply pro- cedures. A few aspects of the Shipboard Nontac- tical  ADP  Program  (SNAP)  will  be  discussed. This system is designed to improve shipboard ef- forts in the area of supply and OPTAR account- ing  through  automation. The  majority  of  the  fleet  is  automated  with SNAP. There are two different systems of SNAP, known  as  SNAP  I  and  SNAP  II.  Both  of  these systems are covered in this chapter. AUTOMATED   SUPPLY The  concept  of  automated  supply  involves making information on material, requisitions, ac- counting, and various files (that were maintained manually) easier and more accurate to use. By put- ting  this  information  into  a  computer,  you  are able  to  retrieve  all  the  needed  information  on records. The Navy developed two systems called SNAP I and SNAP II for the fleet. SNAP I was developed  for  the  larger  ships,  such  as  CVs, CVNs,  ADs,  AFSs,  ARs,  ASs,  LHAs,  LPHs,  and some  shore  intermediate  maintenance  activities (SIMAs). SNAP II was developed for the rest of the  fleet  from  battleships  to  submarines. These two systems are consistently changing with  each  passing  year  through  updates.  Automa- tion is here and it can make the workload easier for  you.  For  an  SK  to  really  understand  how SNAP I and SNAP II work, he or she should have a good working knowledge of the manual system. Although  the  SK  A  school  teaches  the  manual system, the last week will be used to teach, with hands on, either SNAP I or SNAP II, depending on  the  individual’s  orders. INTRODUCTION  TO  SNAP SNAP is the Navy’s plan to automate records for  both  small  and  large  ships  and  marine aircraft  groups  (MAGs).  SNAP  provides  hard- ware  and  software  to  all  Navy  ships,  shore  in- stallations,  and  MAGs  throughout  the  United States  and  overseas.  The  automated  data  process- ing   hardware   is   comprised   of   the   Honeywell DPS6s   (AN/UYK-65[V])   and   the   Harris   300 (AN/UYK-62[V])  for  the  SNAP  I  and  SNAP  II systems  respectively.  Resident  computer  programs or  software  allow  for  faster  and  more  accurate processing  of  administrative,  maintenance,  supply and  logistics,  and  financial  records. SYSTEMS  INTERFACE When  fully  implemented,  SNAP  I  systems  will be able to interface among themselves and with other systems. Although SNAP I software is not compatible  with  the  SNAP  II  hardware  of  smaller Navy ships, these two computer systems will be able  to  communicate  with  each  other  through various   media   types,   such   as   floppy   disks, punched  paper  tape,  and  magnetic  tape.  The advent  of  SNAP  has  moved  shipboard  informa- tion   processing   from   a   manually   controlled environment to a real-time, computer-housed en- vironment.   This   transition   can   help   activities maintain accurate records and allow more timely and  simple  communication  with  other  commands. SNAP  I  SYSTEM  CONCEPT The SNAP I system concept takes in a lot of areas, from the subsystems down to the reports the system will generate. Some of the areas to be briefly  explained  are  the  applications  systems, hardware  configuration,  real-time  (RT)  concept, security, and the subsystems. The  objectives  of  SNAP  I  are  to  reduce  cur- rent shipboard manual workload associated with maintenance  management,  supply  and  finance, personnel  administration,  and  other  shipboard functions.  It  provides  users  with  a  responsive  and flexible  facility  for  the  management  of  the  various functions. The system will improve the accuracy and timeliness of your existing off-ship data re- porting  without  increasing  your  workload. 10-1

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