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Chapter 7 Storage Afloat and Ashore
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Storekeeper 1 & C - Manual for watching over inventory and other things needed in a store
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Calcium Hypochlorite
STORAGE OF SENSITIVE MATERIAL Certain  materials  because  of  their  sensitive nature require controlled movement and storage conditions.  Materials  in  this  category  that  are most   often   encountered   are   discussed   in   the following   paragraphs. Chronometers Chronometers  are  controlled  equipage  that, in  end-use  ships,  are  always  turned  over  to  the using  department(s).  When  temporary  storage ashore is required, such as during periods of either extended  ship  repair  or  deperming  or  flashing operations, chronometers will be turned in to the nearest  chronometer  pool  for  safekeeping. Classified Material Classified  material  will  be  stored  and  handled as per the supplement to the  Department  of  the Navy  Information  and  Personnel  Security  Pro- gram  Regulation,  OPNAVINST  5510.1. Delicate  Instruments Delicate instruments that usually are expen- sive  and  easily  damaged  require  especially  careful handling   and   protective   storage.   Delicate   in- struments  should  be  kept  in  a  dry  atmosphere, away  from  magnetron  tubes  or  other  magnetic devices.  When  possible,  the  storeroom  tempera- ture should be kept at 700°F or below. Electron Tubes Electron  tubes  are  very  easily  broken  and, therefore,  must  be  carefully  handled  and  ade- quately  packaged  when  being  stored  or  issued. Electron   tubes   susceptible   to   damage   from moisture  normally  are  packed  in  moistureproof barriers,  frequently  with  desiccant  (a  dehydrating agent).  Humidity  indicator  cards  or  plugs  are  pro- vided  for  inspecting  the  effectiveness  of  the desiccant. Such indicators turn from blue to pink as  moisture  is  absorbed.  When  the  desiccant becomes pink, the desiccant must be replaced. The cartons,  cushioning,  and  other  protective  pack- ing  or  packaging  in  which  the  electron  tubes  were received should not be removed in storage unless it is absolutely necessary because of space limita- tions. When an electron tube container must be reduced in size, positive identity of the tube and as much of the packaging as possible should be retained. When space is not a factor, the original pack  and  packaging  of  an  electron  tube  should be opened only if it is reasonably certain that the packaged  tube  is  not  the  one  identified  by  the stock  number  on  the  container.  Electron  tubes that  are  broken  (or  otherwise  damaged)  will  be disposed  of  as  per  the  Naval   Ships’   Technical Manual,  chapter  9670. RADIOACTIVE   ELECTRON   TUBES.— Instructions   for   the   storage   and   handling   of radioactive  material,  including  radioactive  elec- tron tubes, are provided in the NAVSUP P-485. MAGNETRONS.—   Magnetrons   are   diode vacuum  tubes  in  which  the  flow  of  electrons  is controlled  by  an  externally  applied  magnetic  field. Special   precautions   will   be   taken   to   prevent magnetrons with permanently attached magnets from   damaging   magnetically   sensitive   instru- ments, such as compasses (electronic or mechan- ical) and wristwatches. (Wristwatches should not be worn when handling magnetrons.) Unshielded magnetrons with permanently attached magnets must be kept at least 50 feet away from aircraft or   other   vehicles   with   electronic   compasses installed. REPACKAGING.—  Electron  tubes  unpacked for  any  reason  except  space  limitation  or  use should  be  repacked  in  the  original  carton  when possible. The tubes should be repacked with the same packaging and in the same position as that in   the   original   carton.   When   repacking   mag- netrons  or  other  tubes  with  attached  magnets, there  must  beat  least  4  inches  between  the  center of  the  magnetic  field  and  the  outside  of  the container. STORAGE  OF  HAZARDOUS MATERIAL Certain  materials  have  inherent  properties  that make them hazardous to personnel, the ship, or both. Most of these materials can be stored safely if  the  proper  care  is  taken. Oxidizing Material Many  shipboard  fires  with  resultant  fatalities have been attributed to improper storage or han- dling of oxidizing materials, particularly calcium hypochlorite.  Oxidizing  materials  listed  in  the CHIL  are  identified  by  SMCC  J.  Nitric  acid,  a 7-2

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