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Supervision
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Storekeeper 1 & C - Manual for watching over inventory and other things needed in a store
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Security of Supply Spaces
successful supervisor knows as much as possible about  each  worker,  concentrates  on  what  the worker is doing, and realizes how the worker is doing it. The supervisor usually adopts a casual manner to spare the worker embarrassment, but there  is  nothing  casual  or  careless  about  the supervision  the  successful  supervisor  is  exercising. Avoid,  if  possible,  the  type  of  criticism  that merely condemns. Most workers mean to do their jobs well most of the time. If you start with this assumption, you will find that you have arranged yourself  on  the  side  of  the  worker  rather  than against  the  worker.  If  you  take  it  for  granted  that the  worker  means  to  do  well  and  you  can  offer help  in  doing  better,  there  is  no  need  for  the worker  to  fear  you  or  feel  antagonism  toward  you. However,  do  not  make  the  mistake  of  trying  to explain this to the worker. Just adopt a spirit of helpfulness  as  your  fundamental  attitude  and make  it  a  basis  of  your  comments  and  actions. When   you   see   one   of   your   members   doing something  entirely  wrong,  your  purpose  is  not merely to stop the member, but also to start the person  doing  the  job  right.  So,  instead  of  just saying,  “Don’t  do  it  that  way,”  tell  or  show  the person  how  to  do  it  correctly.  Most  people  will sense  your  attitude  and  respond  to  it. When  you  have  given  criticism,  you  should carry through to see that your directions are being followed.  Again,  do  not  be  too  fussy  or  obvious about  it,  but  be  sure  that  you  do  the  necessary checking.  You  should  use  a  friendly  manner  in following   up   criticism   of   subordinates’ performance.  However,  this  attitude  should  be underlaid by a firm purpose to get the work done right.  This  will  give  you  a  “fair  but  firm”  label with  your  subordinates. Do  not  be  an  absentee  supervisor.  This  is  a particular  problem  when  your  area  of  supervision includes  more  than  one  space,  such  as  a  group of  storerooms.  If  one  of  the  spaces  is  run  by  a capable  petty  officer,  the  tendency  is  to concentrate attention on the other spaces to the exclusion  of  the  one  space.  To  make  sure  good working habits are maintained, you must spend some  time  in  each  space  and  maintain  direct communications   with   all  your  supervisory personnel. TRAINING Training   in   the   Navy   serves   a   “double- barreled”  purpose.  It  serves  the  Navy’s  need  by providing personnel who have the knowledge and skill necessary to perform their jobs. It also serves the person’s need by enabling the person to gain the  prestige  and  higher  pay  that  goes  with advancement  in  rate. When  you  receive  a  new  member  in  your department or division, whether from an A, a C, or   a   Shipboard   Uniform   Automated   Data Processing System (SUADPS) school, or another ship,  station,  or  department  on  your  ship,  the member’s  training  and  your  learning  should  start. If  the  member  comes  from  an  A,  a  C,  or  a SUADPS  school,  you  have  some  idea  of  the member’s  knowledge  and  some  idea  as  to  how  you can best use the member’s talents. If the member comes  from  another  ship  or  station,  the  service record may provide some idea as to the member’s experience  and  capabilities.  Personnel  transferred to  the  supply  department  from  any  other  de- partment  on  your  ship  are  usually  without  supply experience and you must spend some additional time with their individual training. One  highly  effective  method  used  to  determine the person’s capabilities is conversation. An hour spent  in  a  face-to-face  talk  over  coffee  and doughnuts not only makes the person feel like a welcome addition to your department or division but  also  provides  you  the  opportunity  to  learn about  the  person.  In  this  way  you  both  benefit. What if you are the new member? Well, a few days  spent  listening  and  observing  your  new division  at  work  could  and  often  does  help  you when  you  set  up  your  training  schedule  or in  making  major  job  reassignments. Once   you   have   determined   the   training requirements   for   your   department,   you   must implement   a   meaningful   training   program   to make sure each member in the department receives the  best  available  training.  Several  methods  of training  will  now  be  discussed. Navy  Schools The  Storekeeper  courses  offered  by  fleet training  commands  should  not  be  overlooked  in your training programs. These courses will vary in length from the complete Storekeeper A school of  8  weeks,  down  to  1-  and  2-week  package courses. There is also training offered for various types  of  Navy  Enlisted  Classifications  (NECs), such  as  the  following: l   2814 - SNAP II SFM SK l    2815  -  Independent  SK  Afloat l    2820  -  SNAP  II  SFM  Functional  Area Supervisor 1-13

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