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CHAPTER 13 MATERIALS-HANDLING  EQUIPMENT To  keep  the  Navy  supplied  with  the  huge  volume  of material  it  needs,  many  types  of  handling  equipment have been designed to haul, unload, stow, and issue this material.  It  is  important  for  you  to  remember  that whether the job is handling or stowing material, a piece of equipment is usually available for the job. Any piece of materials handling equipment is only as efficient as the person operating it. If the equipment is not used for the job for which it was built, efficiency is lost. Throughout  your  Navy  career,  you  may  be  required to   operate   or   supervise   an   operation   using materials-handling  equipment  Therefore,  you  should be  familiar  with  the  types  of  materials-handling equipment commonly used at naval activities.  Storage and  Materials  Handling,  DOD  4145.19-R-1;  Naval Ships’ Technical Manual,  chapter 572;  Storage  and Materials Handling,  NAVSUP P-284; and the Navy Supplement,   NAVSUP   P-284-1,   give   detailed information  about  materials-handling  equipment. TYPES OF MATERIALS-HANDLING EQUIPMENT Descriptions  and  uses  of  handling  equipment normally  found  in  supply  operations  are  contained  in the  paragraphs  that  follow. FORKLIFT TRUCK The   forklift   truck   is   the   most   widely   used powerdriven  piece  of  handling  equipment  used  by  the supply department. It is designed to pickup, carry, and stack  palletized  unit  loads  of  supplies  and  equipment. Standard  forklift  trucks  are  available  with  lifting capacities of 2,000 to 15,000 pounds and lifting heights of 100 to 210 inches. Forklift  trucks  are  equipped  with  telescopic  masts that permit loads to be lifted beyond the height of the collapsed mast. Most trucks have free lift, which is the height to which the forks can be raised before the inner slides move upward from the mast and increase the overall  height. Gasoline-powered  forklift  trucks  may  be  equipped with  solid  rubber  or  semisolid  tires  for  use  in warehouses, or with pneumatic tires for use in outdoor 1 1 storage  areas.  Electric-powered  forklift  trucks  are equipped  with  solid  rubber  or  semisolid  tires  for  indoor Operations  only. Forklift trucks are generally used in the handling of palletized unit load. They may also be used for hauling boxes or containers equipped with skids and other large rigid containers or packages. They are used aboard ship,  on  barges,  on  piers,  in  warehouses  in  freight terminals, and on the ground to hoist heavy containers. [n yards which are not covered with hard surfaces, the bucks must be equipped with pneumatic tires in order to  operate  efficiently. While forklift trucks may occasionally be used in place  of  tractors,  their  greatest  efficiency  is  obtained  in their  use  for  elevating  palletized  loads  into  storage  and for   handling   palletized   loads   between   hauling operations.  They  should  not  travel  with  individual loads  for  distances  of  more  than  400  feet.  If  the operation  requires  longer  travel,  the  trucks  should  be supplemented by tractor-trailer trains or other materials handling equipment, Personnel should use a forklift truck at each end of the haul for loading, unloading, and stacking.  A  15,000-pound,  pneumatic  the,  forklift truck is shown in figure 13-1. Figure 13-1.-Forklift truck. 13-1

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