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CHAPTER 3 CORRESPONDENCE/MESSAGE SYSTEM One  of  your  most  important  tasks  as  a Y e o m a n    ( Y N )    i s    t h e    p r e p a r a t i o n    of correspondence   and   messages.   You   will   be expected  to  produce  properly  formatted  letters with   no   uncorrected   errors   quickly   and efficiently-and   not   just   letters   either.   The term  official  correspondence   includes  all written material—publications, messages, memorandums,  and  so  on—that  are  sent  to  or from   the   command.   This   chapter   will   teach you  standard  formats,  variations  to  the standard  letter,  other  forms  of  formal  and informal   letter   correspondence,   and   message preparation. CORRESPONDENCE First  we  will  describe  the  different  types of  Navy  correspondence  you  will  use;  the standard letter, the joint letter, the multiple-address letter, endorsements, memorandums,  and  business  letters. THE   STANDARD   LETTER Instructions for typing standard letters are contained  in  the   Navy   Correspondence Manual,  SECNAVINST   5216.5. It    is important  to  follow  these  instructions  exactly. This   is   the   “Navy   way”   of   doing   it,   and uniformity   is   essential   to   an   accurate   and expeditious   information   flow. Figure  3-1 illustrates a sample standard letter. Stationery The  first  page  of  a  naval  letter  contains the   letterhead   (name   and   address)   of   the activity  printed  on  bond  paper.  The  second and  succeeding  pages  of  a  letter  are  typed  on plain  white  bond  paper  that  is  the  same  size and quality as the letterhead paper. Copies Copies  to  each  Via  addressee  and  Copy  to addressee  are  made  on  white  carbon  flimsy. The  command  file  copy  is  made  on  yellow carbon   flimsy.    Other   colors   of   flimsy   paper may  be  used  for  internal  routing,  such  as  a daily  read  board.  In  all  instances,  photocopies may  be  used  as  long  as  copy  quality  is  high and  associated  costs  can  be  kept  down. General Style A   1-inch   margin   is   required   at   the   top, bottom,  and  sides  of  each  page,  except  for  the top  of  letterhead  paper  and  the  bottom  of  the last  page.  A  larger  pica  type  is  preferred  over elite  type,  and  script  or  italic  type  is  used  for occasional   emphasis,   never   for   a   whole document.   Indentation   of   subparagraphs   is always   four   spaces. Ink  should  be  black  or blue-black  for  typing  and  signature. Sender’s  Symbols Include   the   following   three   sender’s symbols  in  the  upper  right  corner  blocked  one below  the  other: l   Standard   subject   identification   code (SSIC) l  Originator’s  code  by  itself  or  in  a  serial number l Date This  information  goes  right  under  the  In reply refer to  line,  if  it  is  printed  on  your letterhead.  If In reply refer to  is  not  printed on  your  letterhead,  the  information  starts  on the  second  line  below  the  letterhead,  starting 2  inches  from  the  right  edge  of  the  paper. 3-1

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