Quantcast Incoming Mail Aboard the Ship

Click Here to
Order this information in Print

Click Here to
Order this information on CD-ROM

Click Here to
Download this information in PDF Format

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: Incoming Mail Aboard the Ship
Back | Up | Next

Click here for a printable version

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Combat
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
USMC
   
Products
  Educational CD-ROM's
Printed Manuals
Downloadable Books

   


 

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Back
Handling Incoming Mail
Up
Yeoman Basic
Next
Figure 4-1.-Corrspespondence/Material Control, OPNAV Form 5216/10
The  steps  that  take  place  when  official mail  comes  aboard  a  Navy  ship  or  shore activity  are  basically  the  same. They  are sorting  and  opening,  routing,  and  controlling (where   required). Although this   process   takes   place everywhere,   differences   between   conditions aboard  ship  and  those  of  a  shore-based  office cause  some  of  the  operations  to  be  done differently.   We   will   look   at   shipboard   and shore-based  procedures  separately. INCOMING   MAIL   ABOARD   SHIP Mail  delivered  to  a  naval  vessel  falls  into two  broad  groups—official  mail  and  personal mail-for   members   of   the   ship’s   company. Personal   mail   is, of   course,   delivered unopened   to   the   individual   to   whom   it   is addressed. Official   mail   addressed   to   the commanding   officer   (CO)   is   taken   to   the captain’s   office   where   it   is   opened   by   the Yeoman  (YN).  Standard   Organization   and Regulations   of   the   U.S.   Navy   ( S O R M ) , OPNAVINST  3120.32,  section  620.5,  contains detailed  guidance  for  processing  incoming  and outgoing  correspondence. Classified  Mail Classified  mail  is  logged  in  separate  logs for   Confidential   and   Secret.   The   mail   YN opens   the   outer   envelope,   then   delivers   the inner  envelope  unopened  to  the  command security  manager  or  clerk  who  signs  for  it  in the  mail  log. Unclassified  Mail Some  ships  maintain  an  unclassified logbook   containing   similar   information   found in  the  classified  material  logbooks.  Other ships   find   this   too   bulky   or   time-consuming and  log  only  important  documents,  such  as those  requiring  action.  Action  correspondence may   be   also   tracked   by   correspondence control   slips.   Your   supervisor   will   train   you in  the  specific  requirements  of  your  ship. Control  Slips Control   slips   are   placed   on   mail   as required   by   local   practice.   Figure   4-1   is   a sample   control   slip. You   will   fill   in   the blocks  identifying  the  material  and  the  control slip    number    and    pass    it    to    the    office supervisor. This  person  indicates  on  the  slip the   department heads to whom the correspondence  should  go  for  action  and  those who  should  see  it  for  information. Departmental  Routing Large  shipboard  departments  sometimes indicate  internal  routing  to  make  sure  the correspondence reaches   all   within   the department  who  should  see  it.  The  additional routing  is  also  indicated  on  the  control  slip. This  keeps  track  of  the  document  to  help  keep it  moving  and  to  make  sure  it  is  returned  to the  captain’s  office  or  to  the  next  department without  undue  delay. Copies of Incoming Correspondence Sometimes  more  copies  of  a  document  are needed  to  ensure  proper  action  is  being  taken. You  may  also  need  to  retain  a  copy  at  your desk  during  the  time  the  original  is  being routed. If  you  do  make  a  copy  for  this purpose,  you  can  destroy  it  when  the  original is  returned  and  action  has  been  taken. Attaching  Background  Material Before  you  route  correspondence  to  the person  who  is  to  take  action,  make  sure  you attach  all  previous  related  correspondence  and documents  such  as  charts  or  blueprints.  This preparation  saves  the  time  of  the  person  who must  take  action.  If  the  background  materials are  in  the  captain’s  office,  they  are  attached before  the  letter  goes  to  the  department  head. If they are retained in the department, the YN assigned  there  attaches  them  before  delivering the  letter  to  the  department  head.  Don’t  delay delivery  of  mail  while  you  conduct  a  search for  these  papers,  however. 4-3

Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us - Support Integrated Publishing

Integrated Publishing, Inc.