Quantcast Leaping to Conclusions

Click Here to
Order this information in Print

Click Here to
Order this information on CD-ROM

Click Here to
Download this information in PDF Format

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: Leaping to Conclusions
Back | Up | Next

Click here for a printable version

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Combat
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
USMC
   
Products
  Educational CD-ROM's
Printed Manuals
Downloadable Books

   


 

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Back
Pitfalls to Avoid in Customer Service
Up
Yeoman Basic
Next
Amiable Runaround - 14261_23
LEAPING   TO   CONCLUSIONS Leaping  to  a  conclusion  means  that,  in your   opinion,   you   already   possess   sufficient facts  upon  which  to  base  your  judgment.  As a   result,   you   end   up   ignoring   additional information  provided  by  the  customer.  This tendency  is  often  caused  by  a  lack  of  concern for  the  customer  and  the  desire  to  end  the contact  as  quickly  as  possible.  It  may  also occur   because   you   normally   have   a   better knowledge   of   your   field   than   does   the customer,  and  you  may  assume  that  you  know the  customer’s  need  before  it  is  completely expressed. If  a  customer  has  a  vague  idea  as  to  the nature  of  a  problem,  you  should  not  jump  to conclusions.  This  does  not  help  the  customer. You  should  use  tactful,  skillful  questioning  to properly  identify  what  the  customer  is  trying to  tell  you. PERSONAL   REACTIONS Occasionally,  you  may  experience  an adverse  reaction  to  a  customer—to  his  or  her appearance,  speech,  or  attitude.  Because  of your  reaction,  you  may  not  be  able  to  provide the  quality  of  service  that  the  customer  needs or  deserves.  Most  often,  the  cause  of  your adverse   reaction   will   be   the   customer’s attitude.   When   the   customer   is   overbearing, cynical,   or   has   a   smart   mouth,   it   may   be difficult  for  you  to  maintain  a  professional manner. Nevertheless,  you  must  remain professional. Customers   who   have   bad attitudes  are  also  individuals  who  deserve  the same   courtesy   and   respect   as   nice   and courteous   individuals. You  must  also  be  aware  of  your  feelings regarding  a  previous  episode  in  which  you had  to  deal  with  a  difficult  customer.  You will  remember  the  customer  who  gave  you  a rough  time  on  a  previous  visit.  Do  not  let this   memory   affect   your   response   when   you are  called  upon  again  to  serve  this  customer. Showing   your   feelings   may   give   you   some temporary  gratification,  but  it  will  not  solve your  problems  with  this  customer  and  it  will have  an  adverse  effect  on  your  performance. STEREOTYPING Stereotyping  is  forming  a  standardized, oversimplified   mental   picture   of   members   of a  group. Stereotyping   involves   a   fixed   or general   pattern   that   is   attributed   to   the members  of  a  particular  group—disregarding individual, distinguishing qualities   or characteristics. In   stereotyping,   we   form mental  pictures  of  people,  things,  and  events according   to   the   classification   or   group   in which  we  feel  they  belong. Consciously   or   unconsciously,   we   may have  gone  to  a  lot  of  effort  to  build  up  these stereotypes  in  our  mind  to  make  it  easier  to classify  people. Some  of  these  stereotypes may carry such labels as race, nationality, sex, religion,   length   of   hair,   and   many   others. Stereotyping  eliminates  the  need  for  us  to know  the  person  as  an  individual.  How convenient  it  is  to  have  these  ready-made niches  in  which  we  can  place  the  person  and thereby  “know  all  about  them.”  But  what  an injustice  this  is!  This  implies  that  the  person is  no  different  from  anybody  else  in  the  same group   or   category. This  in  itself  is  bad enough,  but  it  is  even  more  offensive  when that  person  is  placed  in  a  category  that  we regard  as  inferior,  and  we,  in  turn,  reflect  this opinion  in  our  attitude  toward  the  customer. LANGUAGE  BARRIERS There   are   several   types   of   language barriers   that   interfere   with   effective communications.  Some  are  cultural,  some  are physical,  some  are  habit,  and  some  are  just intended  to  confuse  you. The   barrier   may exist  because  of  the  customer,  you,  or  both. The   first   two   barriers—cultural   and physical—are   the   most   difficult   for   the speaker   to   overcome. Persons   for   whom English   is   a   second   language   often   have 1-12

Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us - Support Integrated Publishing

Integrated Publishing, Inc.