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Role of the Customer - 14261_19
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Pitfalls to Avoid in Customer Service
THE   CUSTOMER’S FIRST   IMPRESSION Customers  form  first  impressions  about you  and  your  office  the  very  first  time  they come   in   for   help.   Therefore,   it   is   important f o r    y ou to   create   a   positive,   lasting impression.  You  may  handle  many  customers in  the  course  of  a  day.  Remember  that  every customer   deserves   the   same   courteous treatment.  Take  care  of  each  customer  in  a professional  manner.  The  fact  that  you  must handle  many  customers  during  the  course  of a  day  may  affect  your  mood.  If  you  are  in  a bad  mood,  the  customer  will  sense  it  and  feel very   uncomfortable   around   you.   Therefore, you  should  learn  to  control  your  moods  and your  temper. If  you  feel  that  you  cannot  provide  the service   a   customer   needs   because   you   are having  a  bad  day,  get  someone  else  who  will, and   excuse   yourself. This   is   in   the   best interest  of  you  and  the  customer.  A customer’s  impression  of  you  will  usually extend  to  the  entire  office.  For  example,  if  a customer  has  a  particularly  complicated problem,  and  you  are  able  to  help  him  or  her solve   it   by   looking   up   the   applicable reference,  the  comment  from  the  customer  to shipmates  might  be  “That  YN3  John  Doe  in the  admin  office  is  on  the  ball.”  It  is  even more  likely  that  the  customer’s  comment  will be  “That  admin  office  is  on  the  ball.  They solved  my  problem  because  they  know  what they  are  doing.” YOUR   APPEARANCE Just  like  your  image,  your  appearance  is the  first  thing  the  customer  notices  and  uses to  form  an  impression.  You  must  look  good, feel   good,   and   act   accordingly.   It   goes without   saying   that   you   should   be   in   the prescribed  uniform  of  the  day.  But  this  by itself  is  not  enough.  You  should  present  not only  a  correct  but  also  a  neat  appearance.  Of course,  no  one  is  expected  to  look  neat  and fresh  at  the  end  of  a  hard  day.  You  can, however,  start  that  way  in  the  morning. ANALYZING   THE   CUSTOMER We  have  been  analyzing  your  actions  as the customer service representative so that you may  see  some  reasons,  within  yourself,  why you  may  not  be  providing  as  good  a  service as  you  are  expected  to  do.  To  do  this,  we have assumed that the customer was in a good mood,  had  trust  in  your  ability,  and  was willing  to  accept  your  solution.  This  is  not always  the  case. There  are  several  factors  that  often  stand between  you  and  the  customer.  They  can complicate   the   customer’s   problem   and   your efforts  to  provide  a  solution.  In  the  following paragraphs,   we   will   take   a   look   at   some   of these barriers. State of Mind Regardless  of  the  nature  or  seriousness  of the   customer’s   problem,   certain   negative factors  may  serve  to  complicate  it.  The customer  may  exhibit  the  following  behaviors: l   Be   angry,   worried,   or   frustrated l  Lack  confidence  in  your  abilities l   Be   unwilling   to   accept   anything   less than  the  desired  solution  to  a  problem However,   if   you   can   recognize   these factors  and  make  appropriate  allowances  for them,  you  may  avoid  further  complicating  the customer’s   problem. The  customer  who  is  emotionally  upset (angry,   worried,   or   frustrated)   may   have difficulty  in  stating  a  problem  accurately  or completely.   Significant   information   may   be omitted;  opinions  may  be  confused  with  facts; or there may be a feeling that the information you  are  requesting  is  too  personal.  Usually,  it 1-10

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