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Effective Communication Skills and Techniques
THE   COMMUNICATION   PROCESS The  communication  process  consists  of  a  message  being  sent  and  received.  The  message  may be  verbal  or  non-verbal.  The  same  basic  principles  apply  whether  humans,  animals,  other  forms of  life,  or  combinations  of  these  are  involved.  Your  challenge,  as  an  instructor,  is  to  not  merely communicate   with   your   students--but   to   communicate   effectively. Effective   communication   involves   a   message   being   sent   and   received.   Added   to   this   however, is  the  element  of  feedback  to  ensure  that  the  message  sent  was  received  exactly  as  intended.  This concept  may  be  illustrated  using  the  three-step  communications  model  (fig.  5-1). Figure  5-1.—Three-step  communication  process. Sending   The   Message There  are  four  elements  involved  in  sending  a  message.  First,  as  the  instructor  (sender),  you formulate  the  message  you  intend  to  communicate.  Next,  you  consider  possible  barriers  that may   affect   the   message.   This   includes   your   experience,   the   terms   you   will   use,   and   even   your feeling   toward   the   subject   or   the   students. External   barriers   such   as   noise   must   also   be considered.  Third,  you  encode  the  message;  that  is,  you  put  the  message  into  the  words  you want  to  use.  Last,  you  clearly  communicate  (send)  the  message. Receiving   The   Message There   are   also   four   elements   involved   in   receiving   a   message.   The   students   (receivers)   will first  hear  and/or  see  the  message  you  sent.  Second,  the  message  is  affected  by  external  barriers, if   any,   and   the   students’   own   internal   barriers.   Possible   internal   barriers   may   include   the students   experience   level,   their   understanding   of   the   terms   used,   their   attitude   toward   the material,  or  the  way  they  feel  about  you.  Third,  your  students  decode  the  message  through  the use  of  mental  images.  For  instance,  when  you  say  the  word  circus,  the   receiver   does   not   “see” the   letters   that   form   the   word.   Instead,   a   mental   image   of   some   sort   appears.   How   many different   mental   images   might   arise   among   your   students   for   this   one   word   alone?   A   clown,   a 34

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