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Group  performance  repetition  step
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Coach-Pupil   repetition   step The  Coach-pupil  repetition  step  requires  you  to  divide  students  into  small  groups.  If  a  group consists  of  two  students,  one  (as  the  pupil)  performs  the  job  while  the  other  (as  the  coach) checks   the   “pupil’s”   performance.   After   the   pupil   has   acquired   a   certain   degree   of   proficiency, they  reverse  positions.  This  step  is  particularly  useful  in  imparting  skills  in  which  performance involves   potential   danger   to   personnel   or   equipment;   for   example,   firing   small   arms   or troubleshooting   electronics   equipment. You   use   a   job   sheet   with   this   repetition   step.   The following  are  related  techniques  of  instruction: n      Introduce   the   step   properly.   Assemble   the   students   in   one   group,   and   give   all   necessary preliminary    instructions. Include  the  location  of  each  coach  and  pupil  group  in  the training  area,  the  time  allowed  each  pupil  to  practice,  and  the  specific  duties  of  the  coach and  pupil. n      Position   the   small   groups   properly.   Make   a   preliminary   check   to   ensure   that   all   groups are  in  their  assigned  positions  and  that  the  coach  and  pupil  relationship  is  being  observed. n   Maintain   adequate   supervision. Although   theoretically   the   coaches   are   acting   in   the capacity   of   assistant   instructors,   they   are   still   students.   Maintain   close   supervision   over all  groups  to  ensure  the  students  are  observing  safety  rules  and  regulations  and  are  making good   use   of   the   available   time. PERFORMANCE   STEP The  performance  step  is  the  step  in  which  the  students  practice  under  supervision  until  they have  attained  the  required  proficiency. During   this   step,   the   students   apply   what   they   have previously   learned   as   a   result   of   the   preceding   demonstrations.   Consequently,   the   term application  or supervised  application  may  be  used  to  identify  the  activity  in  which  the  students are   engaged. The   performance   step   involves   many   kinds   of   application.   Some   skills   (knot   tying,   welding, machinery  repair)  result  in  a  finished  product.  The  application  of  such  skills  consists  of  students practicing  a  procedure  until  they  reach  the  required  standards  of  ease  and  precision.  Normally, speed  is  not  important.  Other  skills  (typing,  visual  signaling,  radio  code  receiving)  involve  speed and  accuracy.  The  application  of  these  skills  consists  of  students  practicing  until  they  reach  the required  proficiency  in  speed  and  accuracy. Broadly  speaking,  the  performance  step  involves  several  instructor  duties.  You  must  brief  the students  on  the  application  activity,  organize  the  students  into  working  groups,  supervise  the activity,  reteach  as  necessary,  evaluate  the  results,  and  keep  records.  The  following  instructional techniques  elaborate  on  these  duties: n   Give   the   students   a   clear   understanding   of   the   work   required   of   them.   That   includes definite  answers  to  questions  of  what  they  must  do  and  when,  where,  how,  and  why  they will  perform  the  required  work. -  WHAT  must  be  made,  done,  or  practiced?  Tell  the  students  exactly  what  they  must  do. For   complex   skills,   supplement   oral   instructions   with   instruction   sheets--job   sheets   for physical   skills   and   problem   sheets   for   mental   skills. 59

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