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Lesson - 14300_65
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Demonstration - 14300_67
understanding  of  the  subject  matter. The  lesson  method  involves  the use   of   training   aids   to   support   and clarify   the   main   teaching   points   of your  presentation.  Follow  the  same procedures   used   in   the   lecture   with audiovisuals   method:   prepare,   plan the  timing  of  their  use,  and  practice. To   strengthen   the   effect   of   training aids,   ask   questions   that   require students   to   analyze   and   evaluate concepts and   principles while referring t o    t h e    a u d i o v i s u a l materials.  Your  use  of  audiovisuals with   the   lesson   method   dictates   a limited   class   size   of   between   5   and 40  students.  Less  than  five  presents a   problem   in   generating   meaningful class   participation. Besides   the problem o f    p o o r    v i s i b i l i t y    of training  aids,  more  than  40  students presents   the   problem   of   keeping students   actively   involved   in   the lesson. Because  the  lesson  method  of  instructing  is  versatile,  it  may  employ  many  different  instructor techniques.  Regardless  of  the  techniques  used,  the  lesson  method  involves  three  basic  elements: the  introduction,  presentation,  and  review  or  summary.  You  have  specific  responsibilities  for each  element. In the  introduction,   you  must  create  interest  in  your  topic  and  establish  why  students  need to   pay   attention   and   learn   the   material.   Begin   by   introducing   yourself   and   telling   about   your background  experience  with  the  topic. Explain  the  objectives  of  the  lesson  and  stress  the importance  of  the  students’  being  able  to  master  them.  Remember  the  laws  of  readiness  and effect  as  you  prepare  your  students  for  learning.  Motivation  is  the  key.  If  you  can  help students  see  how  they  will  benefit  from  your  training,  you  give  them  reason  to  pay  attention  and learn.   Get   the   students   to   share   experiences   that   show   why   they   need   to   learn   the   material. That   helps   to   establish   their   responsibility   for   learning.   Ask   questions   to   break   down   barriers early  in  the  training  session. Then   establish   ground   rules   by   providing   students   with   an overview   of   what   you   expect   of   them   and   how   you   will   conduct   the   lesson.   Last,   make   a smooth   transition   into   your   presentation. The   introduction   only   represents   small   amount   of   the   time   spent   in   a   lesson,   but   its importance   cannot   be   overemphasized.   Students   will   form   their   first   impression   of   you   during your  introduction.  Since  you  only  get  one  chance  to  make  a  first  impression,  make  a  good  one. Use   the   Introduction   to   get   the   attention   of   and   to   motivate   every   student   in   your   class. 54

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