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Chapter 3 Motivation - 14300_27
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Techniques of Motivation - 14300_29
Applying   Maslow’s   theory   in   the classroom  may  be  limited  by  your knowledge   of   the   students   or   your ability  to  meet  their  needs.  Chapter 2   discussed   various   influences   that affect   students   in   the   training environment.   You   need   to   be   aware of   those   influences   and   know   the resources   available   to   help   students involved   in   conflicts   that   interfere with   their   training. That   will greatly  increase  your  effectiveness  in motivating  students  to  learn. MOTIVATION Figure   3-1.—Maslow’s   hierarchy. PRINCIPLES The   key   principles   to   applying   motivation   theory   in   a   training   situation   are   summarized below: Needs   and   Drives.   When  students  have  a  need  or  drive,  they  lack  something.  A  need  is usually  defined  as  a  deficit  or  lack  that  causes  a  desire  for  satisfaction.  The  need  to  belong,  for instance,   can   motivate   a   student   to   seek   group   acceptance.   That   need,   or   drive,   can   cause   the student   to   behave   in   a   manner   that   eventually   reduces   the   need   and   results   in   satisfaction. Interest. Interest   refers   to   a person’s   view   of   an   activity   as worthwhile   or   enjoyable   for   its   own sake.   An   instructor   who   captures students’   interest   draws   on   their internal  motivation. As an instructor,   learn   to   control   student interest   throughout   the   lesson;   the learning   process   breaks   down   once a  student  loses  interest. To   generate   interest,   state   the purpose of the lesson at its beginning.  Emphasize  why  students need  to  learn  the  material  and  how they w i l l    b e n e f i t    f r o m    t he information. When   students understand  the  need  to  learn,  they are   more   likely   to   give   their   full attention   to   your   instruction. 16

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