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The Affective Domain - 14300_77
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Complex   Overt   Response
Perception  (Level   1) Perception  concerns  the  students’  use  of  their  sensory  organs  to  obtain  cues  that  guide  their motor  activity.  It  involves  the  students’  learning  from  sensory  stimulation  (awareness  of  a  sight, sound,  or  scent)  and  from  recognition  of  the  stimulus  (identification  of  the  object,  sound,  or scent)  to  perform  certain  actions. EXAMPLE:  Choose  appropriate  colored  markers  for  lettering  charts. Set  (Level  2) Set  refers  to  the  student’s  being  ready  to  perform  a  particular  action.  Perception  of  cues serves  as  an  important  prerequisite  for  this  level.  This  category  includes  mental  set  (mental readiness  to  act),  physical  set  (physical  readiness  to  act),  and  emotional  set  (willingness  to  act). EXAMPLE:   Display   proper   student   behavior   in   a   learning   environment. Guided   Response   (Level  3) This  level  involves  the  early  stages  of  learning  a  complex  skill.  It  includes  learning  through imitation   and   trial   and   error.   Adequacy   of   performance   is   normally   judged   by   another   person or  by  the  use  of  defined  criteria. EXAMPLE:   Display   proper   instructor   behaviors   in   a   training   environment. Mechanism  (Level  4) This  level  concerns  performance  skills  of  which  the  learned  responses  are  more  practiced  than in  the  previous  level,  but  are  less  complex  than  the  next  higher  level.  You  expect  the  student to  be  able  to  perform  these  skills  with  some  degree  of  confidence  and  proficiency. EXAMPLE:   Use   the   chalkboard/visual   aids   panel   as   instructional   media. NOTE:   Before   going   onto   the   next   level,   we   must   point   out   that   this   example   objective   could apply  equally  as  well  to  levels  two  and  three  as  it  does  to  level  four.  Obviously,  however,  you would  measure  student  accomplishment  of  the  objective  differently.  You  should  expect  much more  of  a  student  in  the  way  of  proficient  performance  at  level  four  than  at  level  two.  That  is why   you   need   to   understand   the   intended   level   of   the   instruction   and   the   learning   outcomes expected  as  a  result  of  that  instruction.  While  that  is  specifically  the  responsibility  of  curriculum developers,   you,   the   instructor,   must   accomplish   the   desired   training   outcomes   of   the   learning objectives. 66

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