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Body Movement - 14300_52
let  silence  underline  the  significance  of  your  words. Through  your  gestures,  voice,  movement,  eye  contact,  and  choice  of  words,  you  can  convey force   to   your   listeners.    But  your  listeners  will  neither  hear  you  nor  see  you  unless  you  project words   and   actions   with   a   vitality   and   strength   of   conviction.   Force   is   not   loudness,   shouting, wild  gesturing,  or  vulgar  language.  Force  is  knowing  what  you  want  to  say  and  then  saying  it with   implicit   firmness   and   undeniable   confidence. The   following   common   difficulties   with   force   have   accompanying   suggestions   for improvement: Lack   of   volume.   To  increase  volume,  select  someone  in  the  back  of  the  room  and concentrate  on  making  him  or  her  hear  you.  Rehearse  in  an  empty  classroom  and  speak  to  an imaginary  person  in  the  back  of  the  room. Since  these  exercises  will  make  you  aware  of  the distance  involved,  they  will  motivate  you  to  increase  your  volume.  When  you  speak  with increased  volume,  you  will  be  able  to  feel  your  diaphragm  working. Dropping  volume  at  end  of  words  or  sentences. Dropping  volume  usually  results  when a   speaker   incorrectly   associates   a   drop   in   volume   with   downward   inflection.   Develop   the   habit of  paying  attention  to  the  sound  of  your  own  voice  so  that  you  can  judge  whether  you  are  being heard.   Practice   lowering   the   pitch   of   your   voice   without   dropping   the   volume.   Record   your voice  so  that  you  can  hear  how  you  sound  to  others.  Read  aloud,  and  concentrate  on  projecting every  word  in  a  thought  or  idea  to  an  imaginary  listener  seated  in  the  back  of  the  room. Failure  to  give  emphasis  to  main  points  or  key  words.   To   emphasize   main   points   and key   words,   you   must   first   know   your   subject   well. Then   you   can   communicate   main   and subordinate  ideas  by  stressing  key  words  and  phrases  using  volume,  pitch,  rate,  and  pauses. That  will  result  in  convincing  and  authoritative  presentations. SPEECH   IMPROVEMENT This   chapter   has   addressed   specific   ways   to   correct   common   difficulties;   however,   two methods  will  improve  all  aspects  of  your  speaking  voice. First,   listen   closely   to   polished speakers  on  television,  such  as  popular  newscasters.  Their  techniques  of  speech  make  them  good models  for  study.  Don’t  try  to  imitate  them  exactly,  but  study  how  they  use  their  voices  to  give meaning   to   their   words   and   emphasis   to   their   ideas. Second,  listen  to  yourself  daily  as  you instruct  and  casually  converse  with  your  contemporaries.  Make  a  habit  of  constantly  evaluating how  you  use  the  speech  factors  listed  in  this  section. EYE   CONTACT The  most  powerful  element  of  instructor  presence  in  front  of  a  class  is  direct  eye  contact  with your   audience. By   looking   directly   in   the   eyes   of   each   of   your   students,   you   personalize   the lesson  being  presented  and  stimulate  the  desire  for  them  to  listen  more  intently.  Each  student should  have  your  direct  eye  contact  several  times  during  an  instructional  period.  Make  and maintain  this  eye  contact  for  3  to  5  seconds.  This  time  interval  is  appropriate  for  personal contact   without   being   overbearing   or   creating   some   level   of   discomfort   for   individual   students. Scan   the   entire   class   without   developing   a   mechanical   pattern.   Avoid   the   common   pitfall   of 39

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