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Chapter 3 Mail Packaging and Acceptance
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Postal Clerk - Military guide to working in a post office
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Envelopes
An essential requirement for proper packaging is an  acceptable  container.     Acceptable  containers include corrugated or solid fiberboard, chipboard (for small items), metal cans, tubes or boxes, wooden boxes or  crates,  fiber  mailing  tubes  with  metal  ends,  and envelopes.   The criteria for acceptability depends on the container’s ability (strength) to retain and protect contents during normal mail handling.   Although the responsibility for proper packaging of an article rests with the customer, the clerk must be the judge of its acceptability.  Be sure you understand how to check an article for proper packaging and wrapping. BOXES Paperboard  boxes,  similar  to  suit  boxes,  are acceptable for easy and average loads up to l0 pounds. Metal-stayed paperboard boxes are acceptable for easy and  average  loads  up  to  20  pounds.     Solid  and corrugated  fiberboard  boxes  are  acceptable  for  easy and  average  loads  up  to  the  weight  limits  shown  in table 3-1. As you can see, an average load weighing up to 20 pounds  requires  a  fiberboard  box  with  a  test  burst strength of l25 pounds. For a difficult load a fiberboard box with test burst strength of l75 pounds is required for a 20-pound load.  Normally, the test burst strength of a fiberboard box is indicated on the box somewhere in the area as shown in figure 3-2. PACKAGE SURFACES Package surfaces that will not retain an adhesive stamp, postage meter impression, or ballpoint pen or pencil marking are not acceptable. Address labels, and particularly  envelopes,  should  be  firmly  sealed  to containers. Mailings with labels and envelopes that do not meet this requirement may be rejected if they cause problems in processing. 3-2 Maximum Box Grade Weight of Box and Content (pounds) Length and Girth (inches) Easy or Average Load Difficult Load 20 67 125 40 20 100 175 65 45 108 200 70 65 108 275 70 108 350 Table 3-1.—Fiberboard box test strengths used in selecting a container for mailing. CUSHION SEPARATELY CUSHION SEPARATELY CUSHIONING PACKAGE IN SEPARATE BOXES CUSHIONING BOTTOM, SIDES AND TOP SEALING AND CLOSURE TAPE REINFORCEMENT TAPE, BANDING FIBERBOARD STIFFENERS PCf0301 Figure 3-1.—Cushioning fragile items for mailing.

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