Quantcast Dispatching Outside Pieces/Mail

Click Here to
Order this information in Print

Click Here to
Order this information on CD-ROM

Click Here to
Download this information in PDF Format

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: 14317_234
Back | Up | Next

Click here for a printable version

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Combat
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
USMC
   
Products
  Educational CD-ROM's
Printed Manuals
Downloadable Books

   


 

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Back
Film Mailers
Up
Postal Clerk - Military guide to working in a post office
Next
Airport-Coded Tags (Flight Tags) and Self-Adhesive Labels
   Heavy  Density—Small  parcels  of  very  heavy density, such as metal tools, castings, machine parts, weighing over 15 pounds, which are likely to cause damage to other sacked parcels Also,  metal  containers  of  all  shapes  and  sizes should be dispatched as OSPs/OSMs. DISPATCHING OUTSIDE PIECES/MAIL When your ship is in a foreign port of call where commercial  U.S.  air  carrier  service  is  not  available, you should use available military aircraft to dispatch OSPs/OSMs. If your only means of dispatching mail is by foreign air carrier, then you should retain on board all  OSPs/OSMs  until  the  opportunity  becomes available to dispatch them to an FMC or other MPO, unless  directed  otherwise  by  the  Area  Mail  Control Activity.   You must remember that only closed mail may be dispatched through foreign postal channels or by foreign air carriers.   Closed mail is mail enclosed inside a U.S. mail pouch, secured with an antipilferage seal, USPS Item 0818A. CARE IN POUCHING Pouching  requires  care,  not  only  in  distribution and routing, but also in handling. When  operating  overseas  you  will  be  handling large  volumes  of  mail.    Some  of  the  mail  will  be parcels.   Since  you  will  be  the  initial  carrier  of  the parcels you accept at your post office, make sure you do not pack more parcels in a pouch than is convenient to carry. The USPS has a set of specific rules on care in pouching,  not  only  to  protect  the  mail  but  also  to protect the personnel handling the mail.    Large orange, gray, and red pouches are limited to  70  pounds.   Pouches  containing  letter  mail must not exceed 50 pounds.    If you do have to use canvas sacks to dispatch mail, do not place more than 70 pounds of mail in them.    You  should  allow  sufficient  space  to  permit complete closure of the pouch or sack. When  individuals  mailing  a  package  request insurance,  they  are,  in  reality,  asking  for  additional protection from breakage or loss.  It is your duty to see that  packages  receive  the  protection  they  rightly deserve. Do not force bulky parcels marked FRAGILE into pouches. By  placing  a  large  parcel  endorsed FRAGILE in a pouch, you eliminate any possible extra care that could be given. Large bulky parcels should be treated  as  OSPs  and  handled  accordingly. Small packages carrying the endorsement FRAGILE should be  placed  on  top  of  heavier  parcels  in  the  pouch  to prevent them from being crushed. LABELING POUCHES After all mail has been properly placed in pouches, the next step of dispatch is to label them.  Since slide labels identify the end destination for mail contained in the  pouch,  extreme  care  must  be  taken  to  correctly label all mail before dispatch. You should have preprinted labels on hand for the destinations  to  which  you  dispatch  mail.   All  labels used by MPO dispatching activities should be white in color.  There are two sizes of labels—large labels, for pouches  with  large  label  holders,  and  small  labels (strip) for pouches with small label holders and canvas sacks. These labels are often referred to as slide labels. Slide labels must be ordered using PS Form 1578-B (Requisition  for  Facing  Slips  or  Labels)  following guidance  in  USPS  HBK  PO-423  (Requisitioning Labels).  Refer to chapter 12 of this NRTC on ordering of postal supplies. Navy  post  offices  should  always  maintain  a requisite amount of preprinted labels on hand.  If, for some  unexpected  reason  the  stock  of  labels  are depleted, clerks must prepare their own.   To prepare labels refer to Module L of the DMM.  The first line of the  label  should  indicate  the  destination,  the  second line identifies the contents of the pouch and the weight in kilograms (see figure 9-14 for converting pounds to kilograms).  The third line must identify the office of origin which is the military post office preparing the pouch for dispatch.  The slide label should be dated on the  reverse  side  with  the  APDS  and  initialed  by  the clerk closing the pouch. See Table 9-1 for examples of slide labels used by overseas  postal  activities  in  Europe  to  dispatch  the different  classes  and  types  of  mail  to  CONUS gateways.  The gateways that overseas MPOs dispatch mail to vary from location to location; with most Navy ships  on  deployment  dispatching  all  their  outgoing mail to either San Francisco or New York depending on their area of operation. Dispatch  sections  using  preprinted  labels  only have to annotate the weight on the front of the label and date stamp the back with the APDS and initial.  On the job,  you  must  use  the  correct  preprinted  label 9-26

Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us - Support Integrated Publishing

Integrated Publishing, Inc.
6230 Stone Rd, Unit Q Port Richey, FL 34668

Phone For Parts Inquiries: (727) 493-0744
Google +