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Table 3-2.—Markings that may be placed on articles by customers
of  reinforcement  can  get  caught  in  mail-processing equipment. If twine or cord is used, it should be at least 20-pound stress strength.  Loose strapping, especially metal, is not acceptable because it may be a hazard to mail-handling  personnel  and  equipment.     If  metal strapping  is   used,   it  should  have  smooth  or plastic-coated edges. STAPLING Closing  of  containers  with  staples  and  steel stitching  is  acceptable  if  the  following  methods  are used: Easy and average loads—staples are spaced no more than 5 inches apart. Difficult loads—staples are spaced no more than 2 l/2 inches apart. Staples for all loads should not be more than l l/4 inches from the ends of the box. MARKINGS Markings by the mailer must be of a material that is not readily water-soluble or can easily be rubbed off or smeared. Customers should be encouraged to mark the address and return address directly on the package. The markings must be sharp and clear at a distance of 30 inches.  It is recommended that the address also be inserted  inside  the  parcel  to  aid  in  delivery  if  the address on the package becomes unreadable. Special Markings Table 3-2 lists the wording that may be used for marking  and  labeling  envelopes  and  packages  by postal customers.   Markings or endorsements, when 3-5 PRESSURE-SENSITIVE FILAMENT TAPE REINFORCED KRAFT PAPER TAPE KRAFT PAPER TAPE This tape is composed of filaments imbedded in pressure adhesive.  It is extremely strong and only short "L" or "C" shaped strips are needed to accomplish effective closure.  How- ever, closure and reinforcement may be accom- plished by complete banding as illustrated.  It is important to  tape the ends of the flaps ( /). This tape is about 3 inches wide and is com- posed of several laminated layers with fila- ments running both lengthwise and across. It is extremely break resistant and has excel- lent adhesive qualities.  Reinforced tape is preferred over the plain kraft tape.  Equivalent plastic tapes may be used in the same manner. This is a one-thickness tape available in many widths and strengths.  It must be correctly applied, both as to positioning and adhesion, and must be graded in use according to the size, shape, and weight of the package.  It is not adequate for heavy packages.  Of par- ticular importance is the absolute necessity for fully taping down the ends of the packages, ( / ). PCf0303 Figure 3-3.—Closing a parcel with tape.

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