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Lee Helm
SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT All   ships   carry   various   types   of   survival equipment in addition to boats and life rafts. One of these items of survival gear is the life preserver. The  Navy  uses  two  types  of  life  preservers—the inherently  buoyant  type  and  the  inflatable  type. Most  ships  carry  both  types.  They  are  stowed  in various   locations   around   the   ship   so   that   all personnel have access to them. Another  item  along  the  same  line  is  the  life ring.  It  is  inherently  buoyant  and  has  a  strobe light attached to it. Often located near the life ring is a smoke float. In the event of a man overboard, both  the  life  ring  and  the  smoke  float  should  be thrown near the person. BRIDGE EQUIPMENT The   bridge   is   the   primary   control   station aboard  ship.  Located  on  the  bridge  are  the  items used  to  control  the  movement  of  the  ship.  Other items  used  to  ensure  the  safe  navigation  of  the ship,  such  as  the  compass,  radar  repeaters,  and status boards, are also located on the bridge. HELM The helm on a ship (fig. 18-4) is the equivalent of  the  steering  wheel  on  a  car.  The  helmsman turns  the  helm  to  keep  the  ship  on  a  desired course  or  to  turn  the  ship.  When  the  helm  is turned, the mechanical input of turning the helm is converted 7.133 Figure 18-4.-A typical helm console. 18-4

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