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The Supply Corps
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Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
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Courses  in  Navy  Exchange  Management  (6 weeks)  and  Commissary  Store  Management  (4 weeks)  are  conducted  several  times  yearly  at the   Navy   Resale   and   Services   Supply   Office, Brooklyn,  New  York.  A  6-month  course  in Transportation   Management   conducted   at   the Naval Supply Center, Oakland, California, covers material on terminal operations and stevedoring, traffic   management,   and   warehousing.   Supply Corps  officers  may  also  attend  other  courses  of varying  length  conducted  at  both  military  and civilian  facilities.  Course  subjects  may  range  from petroleum  storage  to  computer  systems. Development of a functional proficiency in no way   detracts   from   the   overall   opportunity   of supply  officers  to  upgrade  their  professional qualifications   as   a   naval   officer.   Each   year approximately   100   Supply   Corps   officers   are selected for postgraduate training at military and civilian institutions, some at the doctorate level. Studies  range  from  logistics  and  management sciences  to  law  and  personnel  administration. Long-range   plans   for   Supply   Corps   officers involve their service as technoeconomists skilled in  the  mathematical  sciences,  analytical  methods, and behavioral sciences essential to future Navy operations. BUREAU  OF  MEDICINE  AND SURGERY  (BUMED) The   Bureau   of   Medicine   and   Surgery (BUMED)   directs   the   worldwide   medical   and dental  services  and  facilities  maintained  by  the Department of the Navy. The mission of BUMED within the national defense structure of the United States  is  to  safeguard  the  health  of  Navy  and Marine  Corps  personnel  in  the  following  areas: Care  and  treatment  of  sick  and  injured members  of  the  naval  service  and  their dependents Training programs for BUMED personnel Continuing   programs   of   medical   and dental  research Prevention  and  control  of  diseases  and injuries Promotion of physical fitness of members in the naval service Care  for  on-the-job  injuries  and  illnesses of  civilian  employees Supervision of the care and preparation for shipment  and  interment  of  deceased military  members  and  of  civilian  personnel for  whom  the  Navy  is  responsible BUMED is headed by the Surgeon General of the  Navy,  who  serves  as  Chief  of  BUMED.  The Chief  of  BUMED  promotes  quality  health  care for the patient and professional responsibility for the  patient’s  well  being.  BUMED  performs  budget formulation;  provides  manpower,  facilities,  and material;  establishes  clinical  standards;  and assures  total  quality  management. The  first  naval  hospital  was  opened  in Portsmouth, Virginia, in 1830. In its earliest days, the hospital was limited to a medical staff of five men   and   very   little   equipment.   The   steady progress  made  in  the  naval  hospitalization  system since  1830  has  kept  pace  with  the  rapid  strides made  in  civilian  hospital  services  and  medical education.   Today,   the   Navy   operates   over   30 hospitals  in  the  United  States  (4  of  which  are teaching hospitals) and over 100 medical clinics. A   naval   hospital   provides   relatively   full diagnostic and therapeutic services together with bed care, nursing, and dietetic services. Because accessibility and capacity to serve the operating forces   are   prime   site   considerations,   most hospitals  are  located  along  the  coastal  states. Station  hospitals  can  offer  extended  care  to patients, but they are smaller and more limited in  scope.  A  medical  center  provides  temporary in-patient  treatment  for  those  personnel  with  a favorable  prognosis  for  early  release.  A  clinic  is designed   mainly   to   provide   examination   and treatment  for  ambulatory  patients  and  first  aid for  emergency  cases. Aboard  ship,  the  scope  of  medical  facilities depends  upon  the  complement  of  medical  per- sonnel, available space and equipment, capability of the staff, and mission of the ship. Facilities thus range  from  the  scantily  furnished  sick  bay  of  a destroyer to one that is fully equipped aboard a carrier. Personnel assigned vary from 2 hospital corpsmen  on  a  destroyer  (the  senior  corpsman being  specially  trained  for  independent  duty)  to perhaps 40 or 50 officers and hospital corpsmen on  aircraft  carriers. To meet the demand of Navy health care, over 3,900  physicians,  3,100  nurses,  and  2,600  Medical Service  Corps  officers  serve  in  the  Navy.  Other personnel who provide medical assistance include 13-5

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