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A Number of Programs Seve as the Navy's Source of Procuring Trained Officers
CHAPTER 3 THE NAVAL OFFICER’S CAREER 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. LEARNING  OBJECTIVES Upon  completion  of  this  chapter,  you  should  be  able  to  do  the  following: Identify the procurement sources for commis- 6. sioned   officers. Describe   the   sources   for   commissioning opportunities  of  enlisted  personnel. 7. Explain  the  purpose,  use,  and  content  of  the microfiche   record. 8. Identify the purpose, use, and content of the officer’s   service   record. 9. Explain the purpose, use, and content of the officer's   fitness-report. 10. Describe  the  typical  development  paths  for surface  warfare  officers,  surface  warfare nuclear officers, submarine officers, aviation officers,   supply   officers,   and   general   un- restricted  line  officers. Describe  the  selection  board  process  for promoting    officers. Explain  the  difference  between  pay  and allowances. Explain  the  various  benefits  and  services available   to   military   personnel   and   their dependents. Identify  the  three  types  of  retirement, What  motivates  a  person  to  become  a  naval officer?  Different  motives  make  people  decide they  want  to  become  a  naval  officer,  including patriotism,  dedication,  and  a  desire  to  serve. Rarely is anyone impelled to any action by a single force. Just as people are complicated, so are the things  that  influence  them. The  responsibility  accorded  a  naval  officer motivates many people to choose a naval career. Their  dedication  to  that  responsibility  corresponds to their understanding of the authority vested in them. Many  newly  commissioned  officers  are  not certain  of  the  total  implications  of  their  new responsibilities.    However,   career   officers   are of  necessity  aware  of  their  tremendous  respon- sibilities. Each person entering the Navy takes an oath to uphold and defend the Constitution against all enemies, to bear true faith and allegiance, and to faithfully  discharge  the  duties  of  his  or  her office.  That  oath  leaves  little  doubt  as  to  what the  Navy  expects  of  its  people. That a naval officer must have dedication is obvious. That a naval officer is a professional in the  truest  sense  of  the  word  is  equally  clear. Dedication   will   smooth   the   rough   spots   that invariably  lie  in  the  path  of  any  endeavor. Professional knowledge and competence will help resolve the complex problems that a naval officer faces. The  President  has   “special   trust   and   con- fidence”  in  the  abilities  of  officers  and  has  granted them  extensive  authority.  When  officers  are commissioned,  they  reaffirm  the  basic  oath;  but their commission places an even greater respon- sibility  on  them.  Their  commission  is  a  contract with the nation to do all in their power to render themselves   fully   capable   of   leading   men   and women  in  war.  The  terms  in  the  commissioning oath  have  been  previously  spelled  out.  The  nation 3-1

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