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thus are considered when officers are evaluated for  reports  of  fitness. •  ACHIEVEMENTS—They produce results; many are industrious. The effectiveness of  the  work  serves  as  a  measure  of  their achievements. ABILITY  TO  MAKE  DECISIONS—They evaluate  information,  analyze  the  problem,  and then integrate the two into a sound and incisive decision.  (This  is  closely  allied  to  achievement.) BREADTH  OF  VISION—They  bring  to the  profession  a  knowledge  of  all  the  political, social,   scientific,   economic,   and   military   com- ponents  that  impinge  upon  the  Navy. PERSONAL  APPEARANCE—They  take pride  in  every  detail  of  their  personal  appearance. MILITARY   BEARING—They   conduct themselves  in  a  professional  military  manner afloat  or  ashore,  24  hours  a  day,  every  day. •  MENTAL   ALERTNESS—They   give continual  attention  to  detail  coupled  with  an awareness  of  the  big  picture. ABILITY   TO   EXPRESS   SELF—They express themselves clearly orally and in writing to  communicate  their  ideas  and  decisions. CONTACTS  WITH  PEOPLE  OUTSIDE THE SERVICE—They have contact with people outside their profession through participation in personal  activities  and  interests.  Officers  who allow  themselves  and  their  interests  to  become completely  involved  with  their  profession  will  find they  have  exhausted  their  potential  growth. BEING  A  GOOD  SHIPMATE—They  do not  lose  sight  of  their  relationships  with  others in  the  Navy.  They  realize  they  cannot  function alone  and  can  be  effective  only  through  others. IMAGINATION—They  use  their  im- agination   and   initiative   to   improve   the   task performance of their entire unit as well as their own  performance.  A  fitness  report  that  states “This  officer  performs  all  ASSIGNED  duties  in an  excellent  manner”  could  easily  describe  an officer  who  has  stopped  growing. KNOWLEDGE   OF   THE   JOB—They have  a  complete  mastery  of  their  job  plus  a detailed   knowledge   of   all   its   responsibilities, including  those  of  subordinates. MANNER   OF   PERFORMANCE—They know themselves, the job, the enlisted personnel, and  the  immediate  situation.  They  use  four approaches to get the job done: (1) personally do it, (2) drive others to do it, (3) inspire others to do it, or (4) combine the three in the best manner. SOCIAL  GRACE—They  know  the  rules of social etiquette, such as which fork to use; but more  importantly,  they  know  how  to  show  a sincere interest in the people they meet. SENSE  OF  HUMOR—They  keep  every- thing in the proper perspective; they distinguish between  the  important  and  the  trivial. PERSONAL   BEHAVIOR—They   reflect integrity   and   honor   in   every   facet   of   their behavior. CORE  VALUES The Navy established a set of core values to encourage  personnel  to  make  a  commitment  to personal excellence. These core values consist of Navy  traditions  and  values  that  are  in  consonance with our national values. In October of 1987 the Navy appointed a team of reviewers to determine what these values should be. The team interviewed more  than  100  sailors  representing  all  com- munities, all fleets, and numerous positions within the  chain  of  command.  The  team  asked  these sailors  to  do  the  following: Describe   “tough   situations”   that   posed values  conflicts  or  ethics  dilemmas. Characterize  those  persons  they  admired most  and  least  in  the  Navy. Discuss in very real terms the values that the Navy represents. you  can  imagine,  these  interviews  produced enlightening  accounts  and  personal  insights,  most of which revolve around a set of common themes. They  named  the  following  values  as  those  most 5-7 As

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