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Battleships
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Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
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Destroyers -Continued
The   United   States   traditionally   named   battle- ships  after  states.  Since  our   nation  is  unlikely  to build any more battleships, it now  gives state names to  cruisers,  such  as  the  California  (CGN-36),  and submarines   (SSBNs),   such   as   the   Ohio   and   the Michigan. CRUISERS. —Cruisers are medium-sized, general-utility   ships.   They   have   a   large   cruising range and are capable of high speeds (over 30 knots). They serve as protective screens against surface and air attacks and also provide gunfire support for land operations.   Because   of   modern   high-performance aircraft  and  guided  missiles,  the  cruisers  in  service today are designed to carry guided missiles. The two basic types of cruisers are the guided-missile cruiser (CG) and  guided-missile  cruiser  (nuclear  propulsion) (CGN). Cruisers displace about 10,000 to 21,500 tons. The CG carries guns as well  as  missiles.  The  CG-47 class (fig. 19-3) is the first to employ vertical launch missile   tubes   and   the   shipboard   integrated   AAW combat weapons system (Aegis). CGNs are  the same as   the   CGs   except   that   their   main   engines   are nuclear powered. At one time cruisers were named after  cities;  but after the completion of the Long Beach (CGN-9), the names  of  cities  were  assigned  to  newly  constructed auxiliary  ships  (AOEs/AORs/  AFSs).  The  names  of cities are also given to attack submarines, beginning with the Los Angeles (SSN-688) class. Several active cruisers, formerly classified as guided-missile frigates and  named  after  Navy  and  Marine  Corps  personnel and Secretaries  of    the  Navy,  have  retained   their destroyer-type names. Other cruisers, beginning with the CGN-36, are named after states. The CG-47-class cruisers are named after revolutionary war battles. DESTROYERS.  —Destroyers  (DDs)  and  guided- missiles  destroyers  (DDGs)  are  multi-purpose  ships that are useful in almost any kind of naval operation. They are fast ships with a variety of armament, but little  or  no  armor.  For  protection,  they  depend  on their  speed  and  mobility.  Their  displacement  varies from about 4,500 tons to 7,800 tons. The  principal  mission  of  destroyers  is  to  operate offensively  and  defensively  against  submarines  and surface ships and to take defensive action against air attacks.   They   also   provide   gunfire   support   for amphibious assaults and perform patrol, search, and rescue missions. The destroyer’s armament consists of 5-inch guns and  a  variety  of  antisubmarine  weapons,  such  as torpedoes,   antisubmarine   rockets   (ASROCs),   and Terrier and Tartar missiles. Traditionally,  destroyers  have  been  named  after officers   and   enlisted   personnel   of   the   Navy   and Marine  Corps  and  Secretaries  of  the  Navy.  Because destroyers  make  up  the  Navy’s  largest  group  of  si- milar  types  of  ships,  we  will  mention  only  a  few  to give you some idea of the several types and classes. The Navy’s destroyer of  the  future  is  the  Arleigh Burke   class   (DDG-51)   (fig.   19-4).    The    all-steel construction of     the    DDG-51   is designed 134.109 Figure 19-3.-USS Lake Champlain (CG-57) under way during sea trials. 19-6

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