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Glossary -Continued: Colors - Ease
BROW —Navy term for gangplank. Used as a  crosswalk  from  one  ship  to  another  and  from a  ship  to  a  pier. BULKHEAD —A vertical partition in a ship; never called a wall. BULKHEADING —Complaining  or  grumbling with the intention of being overheard by seniors. BULLNOSE   —A  closed  chock  at  the  bow. BULWARK —Solid barrier along the edges of the  weather  deck  that  serves  as  a  protection against  bad  weather. BUOY —An anchored float used as an aid to navigation  or  to  mark  the  location  of  an  object. CABIN  —Living   compartment   of   a   ship’s commanding  officer. CABLE —A line, wire, or chain that connects a  ship  to  its  anchor. CAISSON —Gate at the end of a dry dock that keeps out the water. CALL —(1) The boatswain’s pipe. (2) A signal sounded  on  the  boatswain’s  pipe. CAMEL —Large timber or rectangular struc- ture used as a fender between a ship and the pier. CAN BUOY —A  navigational  buoy,  cylindrical in  shape,  that  marks  the  port  side  of  a  channel from seaward; odd-numbered and painted green. CANOPY —A cover fitted over part of a boat. CAPSTAN  —That  part  of  a  vertical  shaft windlass around which a working line is passed; used  for  heaving  in  anchors  and  hawsers. CARRICK  BEND  —A knot used for joining two lines. The single carrick bend is seldom used because  it  jams  tight;  instead,  a  double  carrick bend  is  used,  particularly  for  bending  towing hawsers together. CARRY  AWAY   —To  break  loose,  as  “The rough seas  carried  away  the  lifelines.” CAULK  —The   act   of   stuffing   the   seams between wooden planking with oakum for water- tightness. CHAFING GEAR —Material used to protect lines  from  excessive  wear. CHAIN  LOCKER  —Space  where  anchor chain  is  stowed. CHAIN  MARKINGS  —A  series  of  turns  of wire and stripes of paint on certain links of each anchor chain. They show the scope or amount of chain  that  has  run  out. CHAINS  —Area (a platform on large ships) where the leadsman stands when taking soundings with the hand lead. CHART  —Nautical  counterpart  of  a  road map,  showing  land  configuration,  water  depths, and  aids  to  navigation. CHECK —(1) To slow or ease. (2) To pay out just enough line to prevent its parting when under a strain, as to  check  a line. (3) To investigate or examine  something. CHEEK  —One  of  the  sides  of  a  block. CHOCK —Deck fitting through which mooring lines are led. CHOW  —Food. CHRONOMETER  —An accurate clock used in  navigation. CHURCH  PENNANT  —A  blue  and  white pennant  flown  above  the  ensign  during  church services  on  board  a  Navy  ship. CLAMP DOWN  —To sprinkle the deck with water and dry it with a swab. CLEAT —A  metal  casting  with  two  projecting arms  to  which  a  line  is  belayed. or COAMING —Bulwark  around  a  hatch  opening. COFFERDAM  —A  void  between  compartments tanks  of  a  ship  for  purposes  of  insulation. COIL —To lay down a line in circular turns piled  loosely  on  top  of  one  another. COLLISION   BULKHEAD   —A   bulkhead, stronger than normal, located forward to control flooding  in  the  event  of  a  head-on  collision. AI-4

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