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GAFF —A light spar set at an angle from the upper  part  of  a  mast,  from  which  the  ensign  is flown  when  a  ship  is  under  way. GALLEY  —Space  where  food  is  prepared. Never  called  a  kitchen. GANGWAY  —(1) The opening in a bulwark or  lifeline  to  provide  access  to  a  brow  or  an accommodation ladder. (2) Given as an order, it means  “Clear  the  way.” GANTLINE   —Line  used  for  hoisting  and lowering  a  boatswain’s  chair. GENERAL  ALARM   —A  sound  signal  of  a pulsating  ringing  tone  used  only  on  board  ship for  calling  all  hands  to  general  quarters. GENERAL  QUARTERS  —The condition of full  readiness  for  battle. GIG  —Boat   assigned   for   the   commanding officer’s  personal  use. GIRDER —A longitudinal supporting a deck. GRANNY  KNOT  —A  bungled  square  knot. GRAPNEL  —A   small,   four-armed   anchor used  to  recover  objects  in  the  water. GRIPE  —Device  for  securing  a  boat  at  its davits  or  in  a  cradle. GROUND  TACKLE   —Equipment  used  in anchoring  or  mooring  with  anchors. GUNWALE —(Pronounced  gunnel.)  The  upper edge  of  the  sides  of  a  ship. GUY —A line used to steady a spar or boom. HALF DECK —A partial deck below the main deck. or HALYARD —A light line used to hoist a flag pennant. HAND  —A  ship’s  crew  member. HANDSOMELY  —Slowly  and  carefully. HARD  OVER  —Condition  of  a  rudder  that has been turned to the maximum possible rudder angle. HASH MARK —Service stripe; a red, blue, or gold  diagonal  stripe  across  the  left  sleeve  of  an enlisted   person’s   jumper   or   coat;   each   stripe indicates  4  years’  service. HATCH —A square or rectangular access in a  deck. HAUL —To pull in or heave on a line by hand. HAUL OFF  —Changing a vessel’s course to keep  clear  of  another  vessel. HAWSEPIPE  —Opening through which the anchor cable runs from the deck out through the side  of  the  ship. HAWSER  —Any heavy wire or line used for towing   or   mooring. HEAD  —(1)   The   upper   end   of   a   lower mast  boom.  (2)  Compartment  containing  toilet facilities.  (3)  Ship’s  bow. HEADING —The direction toward which the ship is pointing at any instant. HEAVE  —To  throw. HEAVE  AROUND  —(1)  The  act  of  hauling in a line, usually by means of a capstan or winch. (2)  General  term  for  “Get  to  work.” HEAVE  IN  —Take  in  line  or  cable. HEAVE OUT AND TRICE UP —Announce- ment  given  at  reveille  to  persons  sleeping  in hammocks.  It  meant,  “Get  up  and  lash  up  your hammocks.”    This  term  now  applies  to  ships equipped  with  bunks. HEAVE TO —Stopping or reducing headway of a vessel just enough to maintain steerageway. HEAVING  LINE  —A line with a weight at one end that is heaved across an intervening space for  the  purpose  of  passing  over  a  heavier  line. HELM —Mechanical device used to turn the rudder;  usually  a  wheel  aboard  ship;  a  lever  in boats. HELMSMAN —Person who steers the ship by turning  the  helm. AI-7

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