Quantcast Naval Terms and Customs -Continued: Forecastle - Gundecking

Click Here to
Order this information in Print

Click Here to
Order this information on CD-ROM

Click Here to
Download this information in PDF Format

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: Naval Terms and Customs -Continued: Forecastle - Gundecking
Back | Up | Next

Click here for a printable version

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Combat
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
USMC
   
Products
  Educational CD-ROM's
Printed Manuals
Downloadable Books

   


 

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Back
Naval Terms and Customs -Continued: Crossing the Line - Flag at Half-Mast
Up
Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
Next
Naval Terms and Customs -Continued: Hawser - Quarterdeck
keeping things shipshape was impossible. Today the half-roasting of the colors is a survival of the days  when  a  slovenly  appearance  characterized mourning  on  shipboard. FORECASTLE Forecastle is pronounced “focsul.” In the days of  Columbus,  ships  were  fitted  with  castle-like eminences  fore  and  aft.  While  both  structures have disappeared, the term  forecastle,  referring to the same general part of the ship as the original “forward   castle,”   still   remains. GANGWAY The  word  gangway  is  taken  from  the  anglo- saxon word gang, meaning to go, make a passage in,  or  cut  out  (or  cut  through).  It  is  commonly used  as  an  order  to  sailors  to  stand  aside  or  to stand clear. GEEDUNK To most sailors the word  geedunk  means  ice cream,  candy,  potato  chips,  and  other  assorted snacks  or  even  the  place  where  they  can  be purchased.  No  one,  however,  knows  for  certain where   the   term   originated;   there   are   several plausible theories: In the 1920s a comic strip character named Harold Term and his friends spent a great amount of time at Pop’s candy store. The store’s  name  was  the  Sugar  Bowl,  but Harold and company always called it the geedunk  for  reasons  never  explained. The   Chinese   word   meaning   a   place   of idleness   sounds   something   like   “gee dung.” “Geedunk”    is  the  sound  made  by  a vending machine when it dispenses a soft drink  in  a  cup. It  maybe  derived  from  the  German  word tunk meaning to dip or sop either in gravy or coffee. Dunking was a common practice in days when bread, not always obtained fresh, needed a bit of “tunking” to soften it.  The  “ge”   is   a   German   unaccented prefix denoting repetition. In time it may have  changed  from  getunk  to  geedunk. Whatever theory we use to explain the origin of  geedunk,  it  doesn’t  alter  the  fact  that  Navy people enjoy the treats associated with this term. GROG Admiral  Edward  Vernon  of  the  Royal  Navy is  responsible  for  the  term  grog.  He  was  in  the habit  of  walking  the  deck  of  his  flagship  in  a boatcloak of grogram cloth. That habit suggested a   nickname   for   the   popular   flag   officer,   and Admiral Vernon came to be known affectionately as   “Old   Grog.”   In  1740  he  introduced  West Indian  rum  aboard  ship  by  having  a  mixture  of rum and water served as a ration to the crew. It was intended as a preventive against fevers, which so  often  decimated  expeditions  to  the  West Indies.   This   innovation   was   received   with enthusiasm by the men on the flagship  Burford, who  promptly  named  the  beverage  after  their illustrious leader. Forty  years  later  verses  were  composed  on  the cruiser  Berwick  that  bespeak  the  popularity  of  the officer and the drink; the last two stanzas are as follows: A  mighty  bowl  on  deck  he  drew, And  filled  it  to  the  brink; Such  drank  the  Burford’s  gallant   crew, And  such  the  gods  shall  drink. The  sacred  robe  which  Vernon  wore Was  drenched  within  the  same; And  hence  his  virtues  guard  our  shore, And  grog  derives  its  name. GUNDECKING In   the   modern   Navy,   falsifying   reports, records,  and  the  like  is  often  referred  to  as gundecking.  The origin of the term is somewhat obscure,  but  at  the  risk  of  gundecking,  here  are two plausible explanations for its modern usage. The  deck  below  the  upper  deck  on  British sailing  ships-of-war  was  called  the  gun  deck, although it carried no guns. This false deck may have  been  constructed  to  deceive  enemies  as  to the  amount  of  armament  carried;  thus,  the  gun deck  was  a  falsification. A more plausible explanation may stem from shortcuts taken by early midshipmen when doing their  navigation  lessons.  Each  midshipman  was supposed to take sun lines at noon and star sights at night and then go below to the gun deck, work out  their  calculations,  and  show  them  to  the navigator. AII-5

Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us - Support Integrated Publishing

Integrated Publishing, Inc.