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Retirement Benefits
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Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
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Financial security for dependents of deceased naval  officers  is  guaranteed  under  the  Service- man’s and Veteran’s Survivor Benefits Act, which places  all  members  of  the  armed  forces  under Social  Security. The  Survivor  Benefits  Act  is  a  package  deal for   long-range   security   of   service   families.   It combines   full   and   permanent   Social   Security eligibility  with  increased  death  and  indemnity benefits paid by the VA to dependents of persons who die as a result of military service. The latter benefits  are  separate  from  Social  Security  and accrue  whether  death  occurs  during  peace  or  war, as  long  as  it  results  from  a  service-connected cause.   When   sums   paid   by   both   sources   are added, they amount to a monthly income for your family  that  only  those  in  the  most  fortunate financial circumstances could provide in civilian life. That income can be augmented by a retire- ment  annuity  made  possible  through  the  Survivor Benefit  Plan. In  addition  to  a  liberal  schedule  of  death gratuities  and  monthly  compensation  payments, the  act  provides  for  a  considerable  number of  miscellaneous  benefits.  These  include,  for example,  shipment  of  household  effects,  depen- dents’  transportation,  homestead  privileges  for establishing a home on government land, federal employment  privileges,  commissary  and  exchange privileges,  and  Medicare. If a naval officer dies while in active service or  of  service-connected  causes  within  120  days after   release,   the   designated   survivor   also   is entitled  to  the  following  benefits: 1.  Navy  death  gratuity  equal  to  one-half  of a  year’s  pay.  The  amount  may  not  be  less  than $800. It is paid as promptly as possible and is not taxable. 2.  Payment  up  to  $2,140  toward  private funeral   and   burial   expenses   for   services   not provided by the government or for interment at no  expense  in  any  open  national  cemetery.  A headstone for the deceased is furnished in either case. In  addition  to  other  survivor  benefits,  all persons  on  active  duty  in  excess  of  30  days  are covered  by  a  $50,000  Servicemen’s  Group  Life Insurance policy at a cost to the service member of only $4 per month. Although service members will find this coverage is extremely inexpensive, they  may  reduce  or  terminate  it  if  requested  in writing. A life insurance program is an important factor for any officer to consider, especially if one has  family  responsibilities. SUMMARY Navy  life  is  a  demanding  life.  It  calls  for complete  loyalty  and  dedication  and  for  a  great measure   of   selflessness.   It   involves   pleasant assignments and those that are not so pleasant; but every billet you fill can be an opportunity for gain for the Navy, your shipmates, and yourself. A person must be mature and observant to always see  these  opportunities,  but  they  are  there.  At times it can be a dangerous life. Danger is inherent in an armed service and particularly a service with worldwide commitments. But for the person with a desire to serve country and oneself in a variety of  interesting  and  challenging  ways,  it  is  a stimulating,  satisfying  way  of  life. The family of the naval officer is a vital part of  the  Navy  team.  Far  more  so  than  in  civilian life,   a   Navy   spouse   has   the   opportunity   to further  the  officer’s  career.  The  spouse’s  patience, understanding,    and  acceptance  of  additional family responsibility contribute immeasurably to the  officer’s  peace  of  mind.  Because  of  the  respon- sibilities of officers in the world’s foremost Navy, their  peace  of  mind  is  essential  to  their  best performance  of  duty.  Therefore,  the  welfare  of their families, leading to happy home lives, plays a  major  role  toward  the  success  of  the  Navy. The  Navy  recognizes  the  importance  of  the role played by the officer’s family. It also realizes service families can best do their part only when they are taken care of and kept informed of the Navy’s   functions   and   missions   to   the   fullest possible  extent.  Families  should  be  encouraged, therefore, to learn about the great responsibility that  falls  upon  naval  officers  and  realize  how much  they  can  contribute  toward  achieving  the Navy’s   goals. The very nature of naval officers’ occupations gives   their   family   a   range   of   experience   un- paralleled  by  their  civilian  counterparts  in  the world  today.  Inherently  this  range  gives  rise to   equally   unparalleled   social   and   cultural opportunities   for   entire   families.   How   people profit from these opportunities is up to them; the doorway  is  there  and  it  is  invitingly  open. Because  of  their  mutual  importance  to  the Navy, officers and their families have every right 3-22

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