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Lookout Training Handbook
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Lookout Training Handbook - Military training manual for keeping a lookout
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Sectors  Assigned
THE  LOOKOUT A lookout is a person detailed to observe everything within an assigned sector and to report everything seen in or heard from that sector to the officer of the deck (OOD) and the combat information center (CIC) watch officer. The safety and efficiency of the ship depend to a great degree on the alertness and effectiveness of lookouts. Lookouts on watch are under the direct supervision of the OOD. However, the OOD will usually delegate this  authority  to  the  boatswain's  mate  of  the  watch (BMOW). The BMOW assigns the lookouts to their stations,  making  sure  they  are  properly  instructed, clothed,  equipped,  and  relieved.  Lookouts  are  trained in their duties by the CIC officer. The chances are great that the lookout will be the first to observe danger. A faint wisp of smoke on the horizon  may  be  the  first  indication  of  an  approaching enemy surface unit. A single flash of sunlight on a wingtip may be the only notice of approaching enemy aircraft  that  can  attack  at  a  speed  of  500  yards  per second. A split-second glimpse of a periscope may be the only warning of an impending submarine attack. Failure to see a mere pinpoint of light on the horizon may  mean  that  a  buoy  has  been  missed  and  a  ship grounded. LOOKOUT   STATIONS Lookouts man stations as assigned by the OOD and perform  duties  under  the  ship's  lookout  doctrine.  The number of stations vary according to the type of ship and  whether  in  peacetime  or  wartime.  Large  ships usually have more lookout stations than smaller ships. More  lookouts  are  required  in  wartime  than  in 2

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